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Outlook

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Tous les épisodes

  • 16.01.2021
    11 MB
    23:40
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    Moana: the Polynesian family behind the smash hit songs

    Opetaia Foa'i grew up in Samoa surrounded by the island's rhythms, sounds and songs. But surviving wasn't easy and his family moved to the city of Auckland in New Zealand. As he grew up in this new environment he began to look into his roots and started to make music about his voyager ancestors. It caught the eye of producers at Walt Disney Animation Studios who wanted him to co-write the music for their upcoming movie Moana, about a Pacific Island teenager trying to save her community. Opetaia Foa'i made sure the smash hit movie stayed true to Pacific culture - writing the soundtrack's lyrics in Samoan and Tokelauan and turning to his daughter Olivia Foa'i to sing.Although we couldn't include the music from the movie in this podcast, if you'd like to hear this interview in its full musical glory, you can listen to the original episode on BBC Sounds, just search for Moana: the Polynesian family behind the smash hit songs.Olivia has a new solo album out called Candid.Presenter: Emily Webb Producers: June Christie & Mariana Des ForgesPicture: Opetaia and Olivia Foa'i at the Disney premiere of Moana Credit: Supplied by Julie Foa'i

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  • 14.01.2021
    7 MB
    15:39
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    Tasting the desert with Chile's leading forager

    As a child Patricia Pérez would accompany her grandmother on incredible adventures in Chile's Atacama Desert. There they would search for unique herbs and plants by day and sleep in caves at night. Her grandmother would sell the herbs they found in markets and Patricia is now taking that tradition one step further. She started a company called La Atacameña and the herbs she forages are being used by five star hotels, a chocolate company and a restaurant that has been named one of the best in the world.With music from Inti-Illimani.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Patricia Pérez foraging Credit: Isidora Pérez

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  • 13.01.2021
    19 MB
    40:45
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    I ran with the men, and changed history

    Kathrine Switzer is a US runner whose dream - back in 1967 - was to be allowed to run a marathon. Back then there was a belief that women were physically incapable of doing such long distances, and it could even be dangerous for their health. Kathrine was 20 when she signed up for the world famous Boston Marathon using only her initials, but when she was spotted by race official Jock Semple he attacked her, outraged that a woman was running in the men-only event. Photos of that moment went across the world, and changed Kathrine’s life and the future of the sport. She went on to campaign for women’s official inclusion in the Boston Marathon in 1972, helped create the first women’s road race, and was instrumental in making the women’s marathon an official Olympic event in 1984.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: Kathrine Switzer is accosted by race official Jock Semple at the 1967 Boston Marathon Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images

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  • 12.01.2021
    11 MB
    23:58
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    Defending my dream cost my mother her life

    Former US poet laureate Natasha Trethewey began writing to express her feelings about her violent stepfather. She told Oulook's Jo Fidgen how it became her comfort and career, after her worst fears came true. Her memoir is called Memorial Drive.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding Assinder and Sophie EastaughPicture: Natasha Trethewey receives an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree at Emerson College in 2015 Credit: Paul Marotta/Getty Images

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  • 11.01.2021
    10 MB
    22:49
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    The video that turned our lives upside down

    Aboriginal Australian mum Yarraka Bayles was so exhausted by her young son's distress at being bullied, she did the only thing she could think of and streamed a video of him crying to show her community the devastating effect it was having. She was trying to help him, but had no idea it would land them at the centre of international news coverage, fierce debate, and online conspiracies. She spoke to Outlook’s Saskia Edwards.If you are looking for support for any of the issues discussed in this programme, you can find links to useful organisations here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/actionlinePresenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Mariana Des Forges and Katy TakatsukiPhoto: Yarraka and Quaden Bayles Credit: Courtesy of Yarraka Bayles

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  • 07.01.2021
    10 MB
    21:13
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    The rebel musicians fighting India’s caste system

    Tenma and Arivu are members of The Casteless Collective - an ensemble protest band from the city of Chennai in southern India. They channel their outrage towards caste oppression into song. Arivu has seen that oppression first hand growing up in a Dalit - sometimes called ‘untouchable’ - community, and rapping became his outlet. As The Casteless Collective they blend traditional Gaana music with hip hop and rock, to challenge the caste system through their music. Music courtesy of The Casteless Collective and Gana Palani. Picture: Tenma (left) and Arivu (front right) performing as The Casteless Collective in Chennai, 2020 Credit: Palanikumar ManishaPresenter: Emily Webb Producer: June Christie and Troy Holmes

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  • 06.01.2021
    15 MB
    31:21
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    Seven songs to mourn seven black men

    In the aftermath of a highly-publicised killing of an African American man by police in 2014, composer Joel Thompson started channelling his anger and sadness into music. He began setting the last words of seven black men, killed by police and authority figures in America, to music in a complex choral arrangement. The result was a composition called Seven Last Words of the Unarmed. He spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Harry GrahamPhoto: Memorial for Eric Garner Credit: Getty Images/Andrew Lichtenstein

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  • 05.01.2021
    11 MB
    22:56
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    My husband came back from the dead

    Back in 2015, Santoshi Tamang was told that her husband Subash had died in a car accident in Saudi Arabia. He'd left their home in Nepal to work there to pay off the family's debts. His body was flown back to Nepal and cremated. But, months later, Santoshi received a telephone call from a relative who told her that her husband was still alive...Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Laura Thomas and Emily Webb Interpreter: Bhrikuti RaiPicture: Subash and Santoshi Tamang Credit: Subash and Santoshi Tamang

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  • 04.01.2021
    18 MB
    39:19
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    Why I made a film in which I kill my dad

    American filmmaker Kirsten Johnson’s most recent film is called ‘Dick Johnson is Dead’, it’s about her dad, a man she has adored her whole life. A few years ago Dick was diagnosed with dementia. Scared that she was losing the man she loved, she decided she had to try and capture his spirit on screen. But this is no ordinary movie, it follows Kirsten as she stages her father’s death in a number of grisly ways. It may sound bizarre but it appealed to their shared sense of humour, and by seeing him come back to life over and over again it allowed Kirsten to feel like she was making her dad live forever.Kirsten’s documentary film Dick Johnson Is Dead is now available to watch on Netflix.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Fiona WoodsPicture: Dick Johnson Credit: Dick Johnson Is Dead

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  • 03.01.2021
    12 MB
    26:26
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    Elza Soares: invincible queen of samba

    Born in a Rio de Janeiro favela, Elza Soares overcame poverty, child marriage and public scandal to become one of her country's most beloved singers. She started out in the smokey nightclubs of Rio de Janeiro in the 1950s. With her unique raspy voice and the intensity of her dancing, she quickly became a hit on the club scene. In the 1960s a highly publicised relationship with a footballing legend briefly made her a national hate figure, but she came back and now into the seventh decade of her career she continues to be a Brazilian icon. This episode was first broadcast on 11th May 2019.Presented and Produced by Harry GrahamPicture: Elza Soares Credit: Getty Images/ Pedro Gomes

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  • 31.12.2020
    17 MB
    36:09
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    The tale of the little Countess's little cello

    When Christine Walevska was given a rare, one-eighth-size Bernardel cello at the age of eight and a half, she fell in love with the instrument immediately and it set her on a path to becoming an internationally renowned concert cellist. The tiny cello, given to her by her father, had an intriguing label on the inside...it said "Pour la petite Comtesse Marie 1834". This label would prove crucial after the cello was stolen from Christine's father's shop in 1978. It led - 36 years later - to Christine receiving an email from the Breshears family in California. They had been searching for a rare child-size cello for their gifted six-year-old daughter Starla and had finally found one. Could it be Christine's beloved Bernardel? Today, the story of a rare cello, its theft and how it shaped the dreams of two highly talented young girls.Recordings of Starla Breshears came courtesy of Dustin Breshears Recordings of Christine Walevska came from her album Goddess of the CelloPresenter & co-Producer: Saskia Edwards Producer: June ChristiePicture: Cellist Christine Walevska aged eight and a half, with her rare Bernardel cello Credit: Christine Walevska

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  • 30.12.2020
    12 MB
    26:08
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    How I became ‘Mr Vaquita’

    Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho is a Mexican biologist who’s braved poachers and cartels in a quest to save the world’s most endangered marine mammal - a tiny porpoise known as vaquita. There’s only a handful left in the world and their survival is in large part due to Lorenzo's efforts. His work with the animal has earned him the nickname ‘Mr Vaquita’.Jo Fidgen caught up with Lorenzo to name him one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.With music from Jorge Castillo and the Fandango Fusión Fronteriza.Producers: Clayton Conn, Saskia Edwards, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes, Andrea Kennedy Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho Credit: Clayton Conn

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  • 30.12.2020
    13 MB
    28:00
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    The student who fought to pass Mexico’s historic ‘revenge porn’ law

    As a teenager, Ana Baquedano sent a nude selfie to her boyfriend in exchange for a promise to delete it. Instead, he shared it. Ana was bullied, harassed and suffered from depression. But then she got to work making Mexican history. While Ana was still a student, she led a campaign to make 'revenge porn' a crime in her state of Yucatan - and in 2018 the historic legislation was passed.Jo Fidgen caught up with Ana to name her one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.With music from Jorge Castillo and the Fandango Fusión Fronteriza.Producers: Asya Fouks, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes, Andrea Kennedy Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Ana Baquedano Credit: Courtesy of Ana Baquedano

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  • 29.12.2020
    18 MB
    39:31
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    The family murder that launched our campaign

    Brothers Luke and Ryan Hart spent years trying to help their mum leave their abusive father. However, just a few days after they succeeded, their father killed her and their sister. Determined that something good would come out of the horror of their situation, they started a campaign to raise awareness of domestic abuse and to change the way it's reported in the media. The brothers now train journalists and have helped to create the UK's first media guidelines for reporting fatal domestic abuse alongside the feminist organisation, Level Up.Emily Webb caught up with Luke and Ryan to name them two of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Alice Gioia, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Luke and Ryan Hart Credit: Priya Dabasia

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  • 28.12.2020
    19 MB
    39:47
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    My brother’s illness made me a “sickle cell warrior”

    Tartania Brown is from New York City and she has sickle cell anaemia, a genetic disorder that affects red blood cells and can be fatal. At one stage, Tartania didn’t know if she would reach her 20s. Her brother Christopher also had the condition, and when he was just four years old he had multiple strokes that left him unable to speak or move. It was a challenging time for Tartania's whole family, but also transformative for her. After watching the way the doctors and nurses cared for her brother she was inspired to study medicine herself. After much hard work, she is a palliative care physician, looking after patients with a range of conditions including sickle cell anaemia.Featuring a live musical performance from Sherman Irby, lead alto saxophonist at the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.Emily Webb caught up with Tartania to name her of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Tartania Brown Credit: Dr Alexander KumarThis programme was recorded on 3 December, 2020.

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  • 26.12.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
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    The "five careers" of Bettye Lavette

    Bettye Lavette was a 16-year-old growing up in Detroit when she had her first hit, My Man, in 1962. In 2009 she performed at President Obama's inauguration celebration and called it "the greatest day of my life." But the path from that first hit to the recognition she now enjoys around the world has not been smooth. She talks to Emily Webb about how she spent the intervening years "working, not waiting," and kept her faith that the phone would always ring.Picture: Betty Lavette performs during the Robert Johnson At 100 Centennial celebration at The Apollo Theater on March 6, 2012 in New York City Credit: Getty Images / FilmMagic / D Dipasupil

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  • 24.12.2020
    21 MB
    44:08
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    After facing death row, the inmate who turned investigator

    Sohail Yafat was in his 20s and working in an IT college in Lahore when he was wrongfully incarcerated for murder and facing death row. Behind bars he continued to fight for justice, while also quietly revolutionising his prison when he organised its first ever Christmas party. After a decade in jail, Sohail was released. He joined the legal charity Justice Project Pakistan as a private investigator. Through their work, the number of executions has dropped in Pakistan. Sohail is now working on building a reintegration centre to support recently released prisoners.Emily Webb caught up with Sohail to name him one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanWith thanks to Ghazanfar Hyder for this voiceover performance in the interview with Sohail first broadcast on 16 December, 2018Picture: Sohail Yafat Credit: Ali Haider, JPP

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  • 23.12.2020
    19 MB
    39:41
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    The sisterhood vs the man who gave them HIV

    Diane Reeve is a Texan martial arts teacher who discovered that her boyfriend had knowingly infected her and many other women with HIV/Aids. She then tracked down a number of his former partners, rallied the women together to testify against him in a groundbreaking case. He was sentenced to 45 years in prison. Diane is now an advocate for safer online dating and an Aids awareness activist.Jo Fidgen caught up with Diane to name her of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Tom Harding-Assinder, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Diane Reeve Credit: Alyssa Vincent

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  • 22.12.2020
    19 MB
    39:40
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    Surviving civil war with a tracksuit and tennis racquet

    Sam Jalloh learned to play tennis barefoot, with a racquet fashioned out of plywood. He'd grown up poor in Freetown and his motivation to play was at first driven by the allure of a fresh tracksuit. But when Sam took to the court his talent quickly got him noticed by local coaches. He was training around the clock, with a career at the national level beckoning. But while he honed his skills, a brutal civil war was tearing Sierra Leone apart. Even when Sam found himself in the crosshairs of the conflict, he never stopped playing. He’s now a successful tennis coach based in the UK and has a sports foundation that supports young athletes.Emily Webb caught up with Sam to name him one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Tom Harding-Assinder, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanPicture Sam Jalloh Credit: Courtesy of Sam Jalloh

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  • 21.12.2020
    16 MB
    34:34
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    My music bus healing a gang divide

    Justin Finlayson is a former bus driver on a mission to save young lives. He comes from an area of London which suffers from a long term gang divide. When the violence got particularly bad back in 2017, he drew on his driving background and came up with an idea to try to heal the rivalries. Justin bought a double decker bus, built a recording studio inside, and created a musical sanctuary where young people from warring areas could make music. Justin’s project, which he called United Borders, soon captured the attention of the stars of UK hip hop and grime - Akala, Stormzy and Nines. But the project wasn't easy, and the first bus was burnt down by arsonists. Justin persevered and now he's operating in a new bus, surrounded by young people whose lives he's changed.Jo Fidgen caught up with Justin to name him of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020.For rights reasons, we were unable to include Akala’s contribution in this podcast, but you can listen to him in the radio version. It’s available - along with full details of the awards, Covid-19 related changes, and our revised terms - on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.Producers: Harry Graham, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes Editor: Munazza KhanPicture: Justin Finlayson Credit: Brunel Johnson

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  • 19.12.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
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    The Godfather of Hollywood sound

    Walter Murch is a superstar sound designer, who's worked on some of Hollywood's biggest films like The Godfather trilogy and Apocalypse Now. His work has immersed audiences in everything from the clattering trains of New York to the rhythmic helicopter rotors of the Vietnam war. Walter's avant-garde production techniques have changed the way cinema sounds. His story is featured in the documentary, Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound. This episode was first released on 1st January 2020.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Still from The Godfather Credit: Getty Images/Paramount Pictures/Handout

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  • 17.12.2020
    16 MB
    34:52
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    Discovering Stalin's million-dollar wine cellar

    In 1998, Australian wine merchant John Baker was puzzled when he received a cryptic message and a list of wines he, on initial inspection, had never heard of. Once he cracked the code, he realised it was a cellar of around 40,000 bottles - including some of the most expensive wines ever produced. It was being offered for a million dollars, and had apparently been hidden away in the republic of Georgia by former head of the Soviet Union, Josef Stalin. Could he secure a deal?Any comments please email us on [email protected]: John Baker in the wine cellar Credit: John Baker

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  • 17.12.2020
    1 MB
    03:44
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    “The best ending to 2020…

    ...that I can possibly imagine.” It’s time for the BBC Inspirations Awards - a celebration of incredible people and stories. A perfect antidote to a challenging year.Find out about this year’s winners on www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations and tune into their full stories from 21 December, 2020.

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  • 16.12.2020
    11 MB
    22:59
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    The epic Arabic poem that was born in a stable

    Iraqi poet Adnan Al-Sayegh was confined to a deserted stable for having banned books in his possession while serving as a conscript in the Iraqi army during the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. It was in these squalid conditions that he began writing a poem that would become one of the longest in Arabic history. It's called Uruk's Anthem and is over 500 pages long and took 12 years to write - it not only brought Adnan international recognition, but also put his life in danger, forcing him to flee his homeland in 1993. Now, for the first time, substantial extracts from Uruk's Anthem have been published jointly in English and Arabic - the book is called Let Me Tell You What I Saw and was co-written and translated by Jenny Lewis.Extracts of Uruk's Anthem came courtesy of Adnan Al-SayeghAny comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: June Christie Interpreter: Youssef TahaPicture: Adnan Al-Sayegh holding the book Wait for me under the Statue of Liberty Credit: Adnan Al-Sayegh

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  • 15.12.2020
    19 MB
    40:09
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    Who do you think you are?

    In 1994, 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay went missing in Texas. Several years later, he apparently resurfaced in Spain, and he was reunited with his family. But all was not as it seemed. Private investigator Charlie Parker knew he had an imposter on his hands. He spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen in 2018.Rob Weston was abandoned in a cinema toilet in the UK in 1956. Decades later he was reunited with his brother Tommy Chalmers, thanks to the help of DNA detective Julia Bell. He spoke to Jo Fidgen in 2018.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: Harry GrahamPicture: Newspaper article about Rob Weston Credit: Photo courtesy of Rob Weston

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  • 14.12.2020
    11 MB
    23:49
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    The 'Supervet': from bullies to bionic limbs

    Growing up on a farm in Ireland as a lonely and unpopular child, Noel Fitzpatrick found solace in an invented superhero, ‘Vetman’, who rescued all the broken animals of the world. He’s now a pioneering veterinary surgeon who has become famous for fitting bionic limbs on injured pets. He tells Jo Fidgen how an operation on a tortoise almost cost him his life's passion.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: Sophie EastaughPicture: Noel Fitzpatrick operating on Oscar the Cat to give him two Bionic back feet in 2010 Credit: Wild Productions Ltd

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  • 10.12.2020
    18 MB
    38:39
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    Becoming 'brothers' with my guard in Guantanamo Bay

    In 2002, Mauritanian engineer Mohamedou Salahi was detained by American intelligence services. They believed he was a senior figure in al-Qaeda and took him to Guantanamo Bay, the notorious US prison camp. Mohamedou was held there for 14 years without charge, during which time he says he was tortured. A glimmer of light came in the form of an unexpected and life-changing friendship he would make with Steve Wood, one of his American guards. A new Hollywood movie about Mohamedou's story will be released early next year called The Mauritanian. This story was first released in August 2019.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Emily Webb Producer: Mariana Des ForgesImage: (L-R) Mohamedou Salahi and Steve Wood Credit: Mohamedou Salahi

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  • 09.12.2020
    12 MB
    26:21
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    The secretaries who inspired the hit movie 9 to 5

    Dolly Parton's 9 to 5 has long been an anthem for working women around the world. She wrote it on the set of a movie - the hit 80s comedy 9 to 5 starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and of course Dolly Parton. It's a film about three secretaries who decide to take revenge on their misogynist boss. The film was inspired by the stories of real secretaries who became so exasperated by how they were being treated by their managers they decided to fight back. They formed an organisation called 9to5 and Karen Nussbaum was one of its founders.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: 9 to 5 film Credit: ShutterstockPresenter: Saskia Edwards Producer: Fiona WoodsClips used: 9 to 5 [Dolly Parton, RCA Nashville] 9 to 5 [IPC Films, Colin Higgins] Barbarella [Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica, Roger Vadim] Private Secretary [Jack Chertok Television Productions] Bad bosses contest [Phil Donahue Show, Multimedia Entertainment] Coffee protest news clip [CBS]

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  • 08.12.2020
    19 MB
    40:54
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    The man behind Mindhunter: face to face with serial killers

    In the 1970s John E. Douglas was a relatively young FBI agent who would travel around the US teaching police officers the bureau's tactics. John knew he was inexperienced compared to the seasoned detectives he was instructing. But he had an idea to accelerate his learning: go into prisons and speak to notorious serial killers. He spoke to some of the most infamous criminals, including child killer Joseph McGowan. They weren't called 'serial killers' back then, John helped come up with the term. Through the interviews John was able to understand how the minds of these criminals worked and how it could be applied to solve open cases. But the gruelling work took its toll on John. Andrea Kennedy spoke to him about how it began to erode his mental health and very nearly cost him his life. His story inspired the Netflix series Mindhunter. This episode was first released in June 2019.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Andrea Kennedy Producer: Saskia EdwardsPicture: John E. Douglas Credit: Alexander James Towle/Fairfax Media via Getty Images

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  • 07.12.2020
    17 MB
    36:54
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    The sailor and the pirate king

    Indian sailor Sudeep Choudhary was kidnapped at gunpoint by Nigerian pirates. He and his crew were taken to a swampy jungle prison in the Niger Delta where human skeletons hung in the trees. The hostages pinned their hopes on shaky ransom negotiations and the desperate efforts of their families back home. Sudeep tells Outlook's Kevin Ponniah his harrowing story and how his freedom was secured.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Emily Webb Producer: Deiniol Buxton Sound designer: Joel CoxPicture: Sudeep Choudhury Picture design by Manuella Bonomi Image credits: Sanjeet Pattanaik, Getty Images and www.marinetraffic.com/DennisMortimer

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  • 05.12.2020
    17 MB
    36:26
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    Rufus Wainwright: My music and my mother

    Rufus Wainwright was once described by Elton John as 'the greatest songwriter on the planet'. He's the son of two North American folk music legends – Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle but went on to forge his own prolific career. He's got 12 albums under his belt including the Grammy-nominated Rufus Does Judy at Carnegie Hall, where he sang Over the Rainbow with his mother Kate on stage, a song they’ve performed since his childhood. Rufus was especially close to his mum, early on in his songwriting career he looked to her for advice and approval, and her support helped him through a destructive crystal meth addiction. They sang together often, right up until she died from cancer in 2010. This episode was originally released on 8th July 2020.Rufus' latest album is called Unfollow the Rules.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Rufus Wainwright with his mother Kate McGarrigle Credit: Getty Image

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  • 04.12.2020
    23 MB
    49:07
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    Bonus podcast: The Conversation, BBC 100 Women

    Celebrating the BBC 100 Women list 2020, Kim Chakanetsa and a panel of inspirational and influential women discuss whether some changes made because of Covid-19 restrictions could be seen as positive. They answer questions about bringing communities together, supporting lonely people and increasing flexibility for more inclusive employment.Shani Dhanda is an award-winning disability specialist and social entrepreneur from the UK. She founded the Asian Woman Festival and Asian Disability Network. The pandemic has proved that flexible and home working is viable, and she wants to make sure our new online solutions are here to stay so that the world remains accessible to us all.Karen Dolva has been seeking technological solutions to involuntary loneliness since 2015. A co-founder of No Isolation based in Norway, she’s helped develop a telepresence robot for children with long-term illness, and KOMP, a one-button screen for seniors. With reports from around the world of people feeling increasingly isolated because of Covid restrictions – should tech like this be used more widely?Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, became Mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone in 2018 with an inclusive vision of the city's renewal and a three-year plan to "Transform Freetown" and tackle environmental degradation and facilitate the creation of jobs in the tourism sector. #FreetownTheTreeTown was launched this January and already over 450,000 seedlings have been planted to address flooding, soil erosion and water shortages faced by the city. She says we can turn frustration and dissatisfaction into positive change. What can we learn from such an approach post-Covid?Aditi Mittal is India’s best known female stand-up comedian, who is finding new ways to perform safely and online. She also hosts the Women in Labour podcast, and hopes that the increased time at home for many male workers in India has shone a light on the amount of time required to run a household, something that has always been a big barrier to the female workforce.Produced by Jane Thurlow and Caitlin SneddonImage from left: Aditi Mittal (credit Nanak Bhatia), Shani Dhanda (courtesy Shani Dhanda), Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr (credit TJ Bade) Karen Dolva (credit No Isolation)

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  • 03.12.2020
    22 MB
    46:13
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    My Falklands War: the woman with the white gloves

    Sovereignty over the Falkland Islands - known in Argentina as the Islas Malvinas - is still the subject of a dispute between Britain and Argentina. Now that the last landmine has been cleared from the islands, Jo Fidgen hears what it was like to live through the ten-week Falklands War of 1982.Trudi McPhee grew up on the Falkland Islands, she’s the sixth generation of her family to live there. As a child, she loved the place so much that she never wanted to go on holiday, so when Argentina invaded, Trudi’s reaction wasn’t fear, but anger. Although she'd been told directly by the Argentine military not to help British soldiers, when the local chief of police asked her and other farmers for help, she said yes. In an area with no roads, the volunteers' knowledge of the boggy ground conditions proved invaluable in moving supplies, troops and medics across the island. During the battle for Mount Longdon, Trudi wore white gloves to lead a convoy of vehicles, at night, over rough ground. Her determination to help in any way she could took her close to the frontline.Claudio Ayuso and Ken Griffiths were both teenagers when they began their military training, Ken with the British Royal Navy and Claudio as a radio operator with the Argentine Navy. Neither expected that they would ever go to war, but in 1982, they both found themselves in the middle of the Falklands conflict. Years later both men realised that they needed some closure on that part of their lives. After reaching out to each other online, they formed a friendship more meaningful than they could ever have expected.Any comments please email us on [email protected]: Jo Fidgen Producer: Laura ThomasPicture: Road from Stanley with Mount William in the distance Credit: Getty / Dennis Gooch

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  • 02.12.2020
    19 MB
    40:18
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    I learned my mum's identity via SMS

    In the last chaotic days of the Vietnam War, thousands of children were sent away to be adopted in safer countries. Four-year-old My Huong went to Australia and it would be many years before she returned to Vietnam and finally uncovered the extraordinary truth about her birth family. This interview was first released in December 2018.

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  • 01.12.2020
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    Speaking through music: Me and my non-verbal sister

    Jane is Ian Brennan’s older sister. She has Down’s syndrome and is largely non-verbal but the two of them have communicated through music their whole lives. Ian has shared that knowledge with communities around the world, travelling the globe looking for music in unexpected places. He’s worked with Tuareg musicians in the Sahara desert, people who are homeless in California and prisoners in Malawi – often making records with people who have never even touched an instrument before. But he came home to the US earlier this year to make his most personal album yet – with his sister and her community. Their album is titled 'Who You Calling Slow?' by The Sheltered Workshop Singers.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Troy Holmes and Sophie EastaughPicture: Ian and Jane Brennan as children Credit: Courtesy of Ian Brennan

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  • 30.11.2020
    10 MB
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    Fighting plastic pollution in paradise

    When Kristal Ambrose, who's from the Bahamas, had to hold down a sea turtle's flippers so that plastic could be removed from its intestines, she vowed never to drop plastic again. And her mission quickly grew. She started the Bahamas Plastic Movement to educate young people to try and tackle the problem. They took their fight to the government and managed to persuade them to bring in a ban on single-use plastics. Kristal has been awarded a Goldman Environmental Prize for her work.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Troy Holmes and Deiniol BuxtonPicture: Kristal Ambrose at beach clean-up Credit: Dorlan Curtis

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  • 29.11.2020
    12 MB
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    The photo that exposed apartheid

    It’s South Africa’s most iconic photograph – a dying 12-year-old school boy, Hector Pieterson, being carried away after he was shot by police during the 1976 Soweto Uprisings. The picture - taken by journalist Sam Nzima - exposed the horrors of apartheid to the world, and it also had a lasting impact on the lives of all those it captured. Reporter Gavin Fischer follows the incredible stories of the people affected by the photo – both in front of and behind the camera. This episode was first broadcast on 22 September, 2018.Producer: Maryam MarufImage: Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto Credit: Alamy

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  • 26.11.2020
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    Zero-gravity highs and history-making lows

    As a child Kathy Sullivan always dreamed of adventure, little did she know she would grow up to make history both in the depths of the ocean and in space. Kathy was one of Nasa's class of 1978, the first recruitment drive that brought women into its astronaut ranks. In 1984 she became the first US woman to complete a spacewalk and went on to take part in two more missions, including the 1990 launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. After leaving Nasa in 1993, she went on to serve as chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and later as its administrator. Last year - working with US adventurer Victor Vescovo - she made history once again, this time becoming the first woman to reach the lowest known point in the ocean.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Kathy Sullivan's spacewalk Credit: NASA

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  • 25.11.2020
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    The firefighting vets of Brazil

    After wildfires broke out on an ecologically-rich Brazilian wetland area called the Pantanal, firefighting vet Carla Sassi and her team flew in to rescue wounded and trapped animals. She spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.Presenter: Emily Webb Producers: Harry Graham and Andrea KennedyPicture: Carla Sassi and her team Credit: GRAD

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  • 24.11.2020
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    A spy in the family

    Peter Keup's family was shaped by the division of West and East Germany after the Second World War. He grew up in the East, cut off from relatives across the border. But when Peter’s parents applied for a visa to move West, they were condemned as traitors - he was kicked out of high school and banned from his sports clubs. He found a new passion in ballroom dancing, but when the state tried to stop this too he made the dangerous decision to escape East Germany illegally. He was caught and put in solitary confinement. It was only decades later that he discovered a betrayal at the heart of his family.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: Peter Keup (right) and his brother as children Credit: Photo courtesy of Peter Keup

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  • 23.11.2020
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    Separated from my kids at the US-Mexico border

    Rosayra Pablo Cruz tells how she fled Guatemala in April 2018 with two of her children after an attempt on her life and death threats against her eldest son. Hoping to be granted asylum in the United States, she says she didn't realise that a new "zero-tolerance" policy had just been introduced there which meant that any adults trying to cross the border illegally would be placed in custody and face prosecution - and if they were travelling with children, they would be separated from them. Rosy's two sons were sent to live with a foster mum in New York, but thanks to a group of volunteers, she was reunited with them a few months later.One of those volunteers was Julie Schwietert Collazo. Julie heard about the plight of the mums separated from their children on the radio and made it her mission to help them. Rosy has now been granted asylum in the US. Rosy and Julie have written a book about their experience called The Book of Rosy.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: June Christie Interpreter: Laura PlittPicture: Rosayra Pablo Cruz Credit: J Pablo

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  • 21.11.2020
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    The IS orphans rescued by their grandpa

    Patricio Galvez is a Chilean musician who has lived in Sweden for the last 30 years. In 2014 his daughter Amanda travelled to Syria with her children and joined the Islamic State group. When she was killed last year he battled governments, crossed borders and entered a war zone to try and rescue her seven young children. This episode was first released on 13th July 2019.Presenter: Andrea Kennedy Producer: Tom Harding-AssinderPhoto courtesy of Patricio Galvez

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  • 19.11.2020
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    Fire, ice and thunder: a chase on the high seas

    The Thunder was the most notorious and elusive poaching ship in the world; for ten years governments had struggled to catch it. Then, in 2014, a crew from the organisation Sea Shepherd - known for its anti-whaling activity - found it illegally hunting Patagonian toothfish in the ice flows of the Antarctic and decided to stop it. They pursued the Thunder for 110 days over 10,000 miles before a dramatic stand-off in the Gulf of Guinea. Captain Peter Hammarstedt, from Sea Shepherd, tells Jo Fidgen about the dramatic chase and eventually watching the Thunder as it burned.On-board recordings in this piece are from the documentary Ocean Warriors: Chasing the Thunder, courtesy of Brick City TV.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Mariana Des ForgesPhoto: The Thunder surrounded by icebergs Credit: Sea Shepherd

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  • 18.11.2020
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    Skin: the scream that made me a rock star

    Skin is the lead singer of Skunk Anansie, the multiplatinum-selling band whose political, in-your-face music stood out from the 1990s UK music scene. Skin had to forge her own path as a black, queer woman in the white male world of rock music, describing how she grew from a painfully shy church girl into a performer famous for her screaming vocals and bold stage antics. The turning point in her life was deciding to confront an aggressive sexual predator who had been stalking her - giving her a 'fearlessness that never left'. Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: Skin Credit: Christie Goodwin / Redferns via Getty Images

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  • 16.11.2020
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    A scandal at the Oscars: Marlon Brando & me

    When Hollywood legend, Marlon Brando won a Best Actor Oscar for his role in The Godfather in 1973, he chose not to accept it. Instead he asked a young Native American woman called Sacheen Littlefeather to go on stage, in front of a televised audience of 85 million people and reject it on his behalf. It was the first time someone had made a political point at the Oscars and would have a profound effect on Sacheen’s life and future. Now in her 70s and living with stage four breast cancer, Sacheen tells Jo Fidgen about her controversial speech.Sacheen LittleFeather is the subject of a documentary called 'Sacheen: Breaking the Silence'.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Sacheen Littlefeather Refuses Marlon Brando's Academy Award Credit: Getty Images

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  • 14.11.2020
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    In bed with an assassin

    Jason P. Howe was a British conflict photographer covering the war in Colombia, when he met a young woman at a bus stop. Her name was Marilyn, and they started a relationship that would last several years.Over time, it became clear to Jason that Marilyn had another life. She'd disappear at night on her motorcycle. People were scared of her, bars would empty when she entered them. Eventually, she would reveal a violent secret that was shocking even in the context of a warzone. Marilyn was an assassin for Colombian paramilitary forces.Jason spoke to Outlook's Andrea Kennedy back in 2019.Image: Jason Howe and Marilyn Credit: Jason P. Howe

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  • 13.11.2020
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    Unmasking a horror film icon

    Kane Hodder has been dubbed ‘cinema’s most prolific killer’ for the long list of on-screen murderers he has portrayed over the last 40 years. He is best known as the man behind Jason Voorhees’ iconic hockey mask in the Friday the 13th franchise. Kane started out as a stunt performer but his career was almost over before it even began when he suffered severe burns in a fire stunt that went horribly wrong. He tells Jo Fidgen how he recovered and despite it almost killing him why, under highly-controlled conditions, he still loves setting himself on fire.Kane is the subject of a documentary called To Hell And Back: The Kane Hodder Story.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Kane Hodder as Jason Voorhees Credit: Alamy

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  • 11.11.2020
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    James Rhodes: My love letter to music

    British concert pianist James Rhodes is a star in the world of classical music. He's won awards, had several hit albums, performed in top venues all over the world and Oscar-nominated actor Andrew Garfield will play him in a biopic. His career is a testament to overcoming unimaginable trauma. James is a survivor of child sexual abuse. As a result, he turned to self-harm and even contemplated suicide. This is the story of how music became his lifeline.This interview was first broadcast on 1 August, 2019. Since then, Spain - where James lives - has overhauled its system of protection against child sexual abuse. The new legislation was passed largely through James' efforts and is named after him: Rhodes Law.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: James Rhodes Credit: Getty ImagesGet in touch with us on [email protected]

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  • 10.11.2020
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    The wild ride of a Tamil comic book pioneer

    This edition of Outlook is devoted to the impact of comic books and three remarkable journeys taken by artists and publishers who fell in love with comics as children.Indian comic enthusiast Vijayan Soundrapandian has been working to bring his favourite characters to audiences in Tamil Nadu. His company Lion-Muthu Comics translates some of the world's most famous comics into Tamil.In 2017 Outlook reporter Daniel Gross went to South Africa to meet cartoonist Mogorosi Motshumi. Mogorosi witnessed the worst of apartheid, and in the 1970s and 80s, was one of the only black artists using comics to document township life.And we stay in the Outlook archive by revisiting an interview Emily did with Chinese-American comic creator Gene Luen Yang, he's the author behind the first Chinese Superman.Presenter: Emily WebbPicture: Vijayan Soundrapandian Credit: Vijayan Soundrapandian

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  • 09.11.2020
    20 MB
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    CJ Daugherty’s world of literary escapism

    Christi Daugherty – also known as CJ Daugherty – is a best-selling writer of Young Adult thrillers and crime novels. As a child, she would lose herself in books and literary adventures as a way of coping with her own unstable and violent family life. Her father was controlling and abusive – her home was miserable until her mother plotted a secret midnight escape.Her latest book written as CJ Daugherty is called Number Ten.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Christi Daugherty Credit: Jack JewersAny comments please email us on [email protected]

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