Cover

Outlook

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Tous les épisodes

  • 21.10.2020
    18 MB
    39:12
    Cover

    Half a rotten apple: growing up in 70s China

    Writer Xiaolu Guo grew up in 1970s China, in a tiny village by the East China Sea. She'd been left there to live with her grandparents, and didn't know where her parents were. When they returned to collect her age seven, it began a lifetime of change - and a reckoning with China's history, from the feudal era to the Cultural Revolution.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Laura ThomasPicture: Xiaolu Guo Credit: Xiaolu Guo

    ...plus
  • 20.10.2020
    19 MB
    39:44
    Cover

    A dangerous obsession

    Canadian Julie Lalonde looked to all the world to be a fearless warrior for women's rights. Her job involved telling political and military leaders, mainly men, how to behave but every time she stood on stage she was terrified because she was being stalked by a former lover. She talks to Jo Fidgen about enduring a harmful obsession that lasted more than a decade and how she found the strength to go public.She's written a book called Resilience is Futile.If you’ve been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can find details of organisations offering information and support at this address: bbc.co.uk/actionline.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Tom Harding AssinderPicture: Julie Lalonde Credit: Brendan Brown

    ...plus
  • 19.10.2020
    15 MB
    32:25
    Cover

    The space genius who needed a guide to life on earth

    Sara Seager is an MIT astrophysicist. She has made it her life’s work to peer into the spaces around stars – looking for exoplanets outside our solar system, hoping to find the one-in-a-billion world that is enough like ours to sustain life. But after the unexpected death of her husband, Sara struggled with some of the new day-to-day tasks that she had to take on. She tells Jo Fidgen the story of how a three-page guide written by her late husband helped her to navigate life on earth, while she continued making ground-breaking discoveries in the skies.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: Sara Seager Credit: Justin Knight

    ...plus
  • 17.10.2020
    12 MB
    26:27
    Cover

    The downfall of "The Screamers"

    If you visited the controversial Atlantis commune in southern Colombia back in the 1990s, you’d have probably heard some disturbing noises. The group practiced primal screaming, a form of psychotherapy which seeks to address childhood pain. They’d hold confrontational group sessions, where they were encouraged to direct their anger at each other, hoping to develop themselves psychologically in the process.The commune had started in London, founded by a therapist called Jenny James. They’d made the move to South America to be closer to nature, and they’d settled on a forested area of Colombia controlled by left wing Farc guerrillas. At first Atlantis coexisted with the Farc, but as the Colombian civil war intensified the guerrillas became more hostile, and when violence broke out it pulled the commune apart.Presenter: Faye Planer Producer: Harry GrahamPicture: The Atlantis commune in Southern Colombia Credit: BBC

    ...plus
  • 15.10.2020
    10 MB
    21:52
    Cover

    The actor who’s been saying the same lines for 32 years

    Groundhog Day... deja vu... are phrases that tend to have negative connotations. Repetition is often equated with monotony. Not so for Catherine Russell. She holds the world record for the most theatre performances in the same role and she wouldn't have it any other way. For the past 32 years she has been playing the role of Margaret Thorne Brent - a psychiatrist who might also be a cold-blooded killer in the long running off-Broadway play ‘Perfect Crime’.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Fiona WoodsPhoto: Catherine Russell in Perfect Crime Credit: Shir Stein

    ...plus
  • 14.10.2020
    11 MB
    22:55
    Cover

    Farming and Phil Collins taught me about love

    Simon Dawson was on a wayward path after a difficult childhood. He says his mother would tell him directly that she didn't love him. Things were at their lowest when their family house burnt down and Simon was blamed for it. Unsure of love, he turned to music for answers. But the real lessons came later in life when he set up a farm and the animals he cared for showed him what true guardianship and acceptance means. Simon now believes his mother suffered from postnatal depression and was never given the support she needed. He tells Emily Webb how he turned things around and learned to love. Simon's book is called The Boy Without Love.Producer: Mariana Des Forges Presenter: Emily WebbPicture: Simon Dawson on his farm in Exmoor Credit: Courtesy of Simon Dawson

    ...plus
  • 13.10.2020
    10 MB
    22:26
    Cover

    The black reverend who bought a Ku Klux Klan shop

    In 1996, an African American reverend called David Kennedy faced one of his biggest fights. A new shop had sprung up in Laurens, his small town in South Carolina, selling white supremacist memorabilia and housing a Ku Klux Klan museum. It was called the Redneck Shop, and Reverend Kennedy knew he had to stand up to the racist owners. At first he simply stood outside in protest, but later he was able to start changing the mind of one of the managers, Mike, having helped him in a time of need. The two men became close, and through their friendship the reverend ultimately gained control of the white supremacist shop. Reverend Kennedy spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Harry GrahamPicture: Reverend David Kennedy Credit: The Echo Project

    ...plus
  • 12.10.2020
    19 MB
    39:58
    Cover

    Abducted in war, saving lives in peace

    During Sierra Leone's civil war Aminata Conteh-Biger was abducted by armed rebels. After her release, she began a new life in Australia but has since returned to help the women she'd left behind, becoming a champion of maternal health in a country with one of the worst maternal and infant mortality rates in the world. She is the founder of the Aminata Maternal Foundation and has written a book about her life called Rising Heart.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Tom Harding AssinderPicture: Aminata Conteh-Biger Credit: Jeremy Simons

    ...plus
  • 10.10.2020
    12 MB
    26:29
    Cover

    Why I didn’t make a sound for 12 years

    Marie McCreadie moved to Australia from the UK as a young girl in the 1970s. It was the start of a new adventure for the whole family, but then one day when Marie was 13 she lost her voice, leaving her unable to make a sound for over a decade. Marie was ostracised, told she was cursed, and was put in a psychiatric unit. Then, in her twenties she discovered the surprising cause of her condition. This episode was first released on 5th October 2019.Marie has written a book about her life without speech it's called Voiceless.Presenter: Andrea Kennedy Producer: Tom Harding AssinderPicture: Marie McCreadie as a young teenager Credit: Marie McCreadie

    ...plus
  • 08.10.2020
    19 MB
    39:36
    Cover

    Sarajevo Siege - the band that drowned out the bombs

    By 1994, the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo had been under siege for two years. Sniper fire and shelling were a daily threat to the residents stuck in the city. Though life was tough, artistic creativity flourished. The heavy metal community was one particularly resilient music scene. Whilst there were still local gigs there was a hunger for something bigger, to know the rest of the world had not forgotten them. A group of firefighters and UN peacekeepers, decided that the city needed a big name rock act to keep morale up. Only one rock star was willing to do it, Bruce Dickinson, the frontman of Iron Maiden. The organisers got a venue, and petrol for their power generators. But there was one particular challenge they had to overcome - how do you get a rock star into a city surrounded by warring armies? This episode was first released on 26th April 2019.Presenter: Saskia Edwards Producer: Harry GrahamImage: The audience at a metal gig in Sarajevo Credit: Scream For Me Sarajevo Film

    ...plus
  • 07.10.2020
    18 MB
    39:13
    Cover

    We found our baby on the subway

    In 2000 Danny Stewart found a newborn baby boy, tucked in the corner of a New York subway station on his way home from work. The discovery hit the headlines, but when no one came forward to claim the baby the family court judge asked Danny if he would like to adopt him. Danny and his partner Peter Mercurio had never discussed raising a child together, but soon found themselves on an extraordinary journey.Peter has written a book about their story, called Our Subway Baby.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: (from left) Peter, Kevin and Danny Credit: Photo courtesy of Peter Mercurio

    ...plus
  • 06.10.2020
    10 MB
    22:42
    Cover

    My ancestors changed the lives of slaves in the US

    Nettie Washington Douglass tells Anu Anand what it's like to carry the names and bloodlines of two African-Americans who were born into slavery but famously devoted their lives to fighting it, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.Nettie descends from pioneering educator Booker T Washington and the abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass. Her influential ancestors inspired her to raise awareness about modern-day slavery by setting up the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Deiniol BuxtonPicture: Nettie Washington Douglass Credit: Hilary Schwab Photography

    ...plus
  • 05.10.2020
    14 MB
    29:38
    Cover

    Ice Prince: The making of a Nigerian hip hop star

    Growing up in the city of Jos in central Nigeria, Panshak Zamani better known as Ice Prince, never set out to become a musician. But through personal loss and the violent crisis he saw unfolding on the streets, he found solace in singing and rap. Panshak tells Anu Anand how he overcame his struggles to write a hit song that became one of the most remixed ever in Nigeria and rose to international fame.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Sophie EastaughPicture: Ice Prince Credit: Photogod

    ...plus
  • 03.10.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
    Cover

    I discovered my dad was a best-selling sex writer

    Sara Faith Alterman was eight when she accidently discovered that her prudish dad was secretly a globally successful writer of adult books. Growing up, it was never discussed, but when he was dying of Alzheimer's in his late 60s, he asked Sara to help him write again before it was too late.Sara Faith Alterman’s memoir is called Lets Never Talk about this Again.Presented and Produced by Mariana Des ForgesPicture: A young Sara and Ira Alterman Credit: Courtesy of Sara Faith Alterman

    ...plus
  • 01.10.2020
    16 MB
    35:24
    Cover

    "This is what a barrister looks like"

    Alexandra Wilson is a young black British barrister - and as a result sometimes gets mistaken for the defendant in court. Growing up in Essex she never imagined herself becoming a lawyer, but the murder of a close family friend inspired her career. She studied at Oxford University and was eventually awarded a Queen’s Scholarship, given to students who show exceptional promise at the Bar. She tells Emily Webb why she's fighting to create a more diverse legal profession.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: June Christie Picture:Alexandra Wilson Credit: Laurie Lewis

    ...plus
  • 30.09.2020
    19 MB
    39:52
    Cover

    A star in her teens, a star in her 70s

    Bettye LaVette was a 16-year-old growing up in Detroit when she had her first hit, My Man, in 1962. In 2009 she performed at President Obama's inauguration celebration and called it "the greatest day of my life". But the path from that first hit to the recognition she now enjoys around the world has not been smooth. She talks to Emily Webb about how she spent the intervening years "working, not waiting," and kept her faith that the phone would always ring. Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Laura ThomasPicture: Betty Lavette performs during the Robert Johnson At 100 Centennial celebration at The Apollo Theater on March 6, 2012 in New York City Credit: Getty Images / FilmMagic / D Dipasupil

    ...plus
  • 29.09.2020
    10 MB
    21:21
    Cover

    Surviving a chemical attack by a doomsday cult

    When Atsushi Sakahara boarded a crowded train on the Tokyo subway in 1995, he found himself in the middle of a targeted chemical attack. Years later he went looking for answers from a notorious doomsday cult, which led to an unlikely friendship. Atsushi has directed a documentary about his journey called Me and The Cult Leader.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Troy HolmesPicture: Atsushi Sakahara and Hiroshi Araki Credit: Nori Matsui 2020 Good People Inc.

    ...plus
  • 28.09.2020
    10 MB
    21:26
    Cover

    My ancestors were both slaves and slave owners

    Malik Al Nasir was casually watching a TV documentary when a face jumped out at him – it was a photograph of the black Victorian football star Andrew Watson. He was stunned at the close resemblance between them and he was determined to find out how they were connected. Little did he know that that journey would lead him from Liverpool to Guyana to discover how his family history was inextricably connected with the international slave trade.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Wahiba AhmedPicture: Malik Al Nasir at the airport in Guyana in 2008 Credit: Abdul Malik Al Nasir

    ...plus
  • 26.09.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
    Cover

    Vietnam's first family of rock ‘n’ roll

    In the 1960s, a bunch of musically gifted, pre-teen siblings from Saigon put together a rock ‘n’ roll group. For a while the CBC Band was the biggest music act in South Vietnam, even headlining the country’s first international rock festival. They had an unlikely fan base – battle-weary US soldiers fighting in the Vietnam War. This episode was first released on the 9th of February 2019.Presenter: Harry Graham Producer: Maryam MarufImage: The CBC Band in Vietnam Credit: Courtesy of the CBC Band

    ...plus
  • 24.09.2020
    28 MB
    58:51
    Cover

    Life without parole: Our fight for freedom

    Brittany K. Barnett, an African American lawyer, grew up in the shadow of the US war on drugs in the 1980s. Like many others in her community in rural east Texas, Brittany’s mother was addicted to crack cocaine, and when Brittany was 22 years old, her mother was sentenced to eight years in prison. Only a few years later, she discovered the case of Sharanda Jones, a black woman who was sentenced to life without parole for a first time drug offence. Spurred on by her own family history, Brittany swore she would free Sharanda. Brittany was still just a law student and studying corporate law but she persevered for years taking their fight to the highest office - all the way to the White House. After 16 years of waiting, Sharanda finally received the call that would grant her freedom. Together they have founded the Buried Alive Project, which provides free legal support for people serving life sentences in federal prison and Brittany has written a book called A Knock at Midnight about her life and work. Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Tom Harding Assinder Picture: Brittany K. Barnett and Sharanda Jones in 2009 Credit: Courtesy of Brittany K. Barnett

    ...plus
  • 22.09.2020
    16 MB
    33:35
    Cover

    How the tigress of basketball fought back

    Malebogo Molefhe is a trailblazing basketball player from Botswana. The only girl in a game played by boys, she was called the 'tigress' and rose to be captain of her country's first ever women's national basketball team. But off the court she was controlled and abused by her partner, culminating in a brutal attack where he shot her eight times, leaving both her legs paralysed. Traumatised and with life-changing injuries, Malebogo fought to reclaim her life - and to find a way back to basketball.If you’ve been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can find details of organisations offering information and support at BBC Action Line: www.bbc.co.uk/actionline.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Malebogo Molefhe, bottom left Credit: Courtesy of Malebogo Molefhe

    ...plus
  • 21.09.2020
    11 MB
    23:02
    Cover

    Documenting my cellmates' names in blood and rust

    Mansour Omari spent nearly a year in a Syrian government prison in 2012. We hear his account of life in an underground cell and how, against the odds, he managed to smuggle out the names of his fellow cellmates to their loved ones - by writing them down, using chicken bones and blood on a piece of cloth. This story was first released on 20th March 2017.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Emily WebbImage: Mansour Omari's list of names Credit: Mansour Omari

    ...plus
  • 19.09.2020
    21 MB
    45:36
    Cover

    The boldest human experiment of the last century?

    When an intrepid crew of eight entered Biosphere 2, a giant air-tight greenhouse in the Arizona desert in September 1991, no one knew how it would pan out. It was an experiment to see if humans could live in similar glass worlds on other planets. Their intention was to survive by cultivating the farmland and plant life inside to create the food and oxygen they needed, but quickly both ran dangerously low. This is the story of how original 'Biospherians' Mark Nelson, Sally Silverstone, Jane Poynter and Taber MacCallum endured what's been called one of the most audacious, unusual and controversial experiments of the last decade.Mark Nelson and Sally Silverstone have released a new edition the book they wrote whilst inside Biosphere 2 called 'Life Under Glass: Crucial Lessons in Planetary Stewardship from 2 Years in Biosphere 2'.Presented and produced by Saskia Edwards Additional production by Mariana Des ForgesPicture: The original crew outside Biosphere 2 Credit: Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 17.09.2020
    11 MB
    24:05
    Cover

    My father and our time machine

    Artist Maleonn spent his childhood in the back of a theatre, watching his parents at work. Maleonn’s mother was an actress, and his father directed “very noisy” and “incredibly colourful” Beijing opera performances. Though his father was keen, Maleonn was determined not to follow in his directorial footsteps and instead chased his passion for art. But when his father began to lose his memory in 2014, Maleonn decided to create a play just for him, he called it Papa’s Time Machine. Maleonn wanted to give his father the gift that he had always dreamed of - but it was a race against time.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Fiona WoodsPicture: One of the puppets in Papa's Time Machine Credit: Papa's Time Machine

    ...plus
  • 16.09.2020
    11 MB
    24:15
    Cover

    I bought a ghost town - then got trapped there

    Brent Underwood is a young American entrepreneur who spent his life savings on the remains of an abandoned 19th century mining town in California. He was fascinated by its Wild West history, but when he got trapped there by heavy snow earlier this year, all alone, the ghostly tales about the place began to feel all too real. Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Rebecca VincentPicture: Brent Underwood at Cerro Gordo Credit: Brent Underwood

    ...plus
  • 15.09.2020
    11 MB
    24:13
    Cover

    Becoming South Africa's first black rugby captain

    South African rugby star Siya Kolisi came from a poor township and tells Outlook's Mpho Lakaje about his journey from water boy to becoming the national team's first black captain and leading the Sprinboks to World Cup victory. Siya and his wife Rachel have set up a charity, The Kolisi Foundation, to help vulnerable and disadvantaged communities in South Africa.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Deiniol BuxtonPicture: Siya Kolisi and the Springboks team after their Rugby World Cup win. Credit: Cameron Spencer/ Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 14.09.2020
    14 MB
    30:34
    Cover

    My soldier dad's goodbye tape

    Tricia Davies Nearn’s father, David, was killed in the Vietnam War when she was just two years old. Growing up without him, she knew there was something missing, even with a loving family around her. Her mother, an ardent fan of Broadway musicals, liked to sing along to A Chorus Line while vacuuming, but there was one musical she never played: West Side Story . The discovery of an extraordinary archive of tape recordings, made while David was posted in Vietnam, eventually helped Tricia to understand why - and to get to know her father better.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Emily WebbPicture: David Davies Credit: Tricia Davies Nearn

    ...plus
  • 10.09.2020
    19 MB
    40:35
    Cover

    The trans boxer learning the many ways to be a man

    With only five and a half months of training, Thomas Page McBee became the first transgender man to box at the famous Madison Square Garden arena in New York City. He's an author and journalist by trade so this was quite a departure for him. His journey to that day wasn’t driven by dreams of record-breaking, instead, it was prompted by a desire to better understand the different ways to be a man and specifically the relationship between masculinity and violence. Thomas had grown up with an abusive step-father and he knew he wanted to be different. When he began transitioning from a female to a male body in adulthood he noticed a change in the way the world was treating him. Women were crossing the road when they encountered him walking late at night, rooms fell silent when his deep voice spoke up in conversations, and he was no longer encouraged to hug because “men shake hands”. So in an attempt to learn the many different ways to be a man Thomas set himself a challenge - a boxing match.Presenter: Anu Anand Producer: Sophie Eastaugh and Andrea KennedyPicture: Thomas Page McBee Credit: Amos Mac

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    18 MB
    38:59
    Cover

    A descendant of chiefs: my long journey home

    Today, Jesse Thistle is a celebrated professor of Indigenous history in Canada. But as a child, he was a high school drop-out, raised by his disciplinarian white paternal grandparents and cut off from his mother and his Métis Cree roots. It set him on a self-destructive path to drug addiction, homelessness and prison. In jail and in his 30s, Jesse learned to read. After he was released, he would reach the pinnacle of academic success – finding his identity, his calling and along the way, his long-lost mother. Jesse’s memoir is called From the Ashes.Presented by Anu Anand Produced by Sophie Eastaugh and Maryam MarufImage: Jesse Thistle Credit: Lucie Thistle

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    23:00
    Cover

    The girl who cycled her father 1,200km to safety

    When India went into lockdown in response to the coronavirus crisis, millions of migrant workers staying in the cities were left unemployed and stranded. Jyoti Kumari and her dad Mohan Paswan were among them. With no work, they were running out of food and couldn't pay rent. Many migrant workers were travelling hundreds of kilometres on foot to get back to their home villages, but Mohan had been injured in a rickshaw accident and couldn't walk. So Jyoti bought a heavy old bicycle, sat her dad on the back, and cycled 1200km across the country. They spoke to Outlook's Nitin Srivastava.If you make a phone call in India at the moment, chances are you'll hear Jasleen Bhalla's voice. She's the voice artist giving public service announcements, telling people to stay safe during the pandemic, before any call is connected. With millions listening every day across the country, the messages have elicited some strong reactions. Some call Jasleen a 'corona warrior', others find the messages very annoying.Presenter: Nitin Srivastava Producer: Harry GrahamPicture: Jyoti Kumari and Mohan Paswan on their bike Credit: BBC

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    18 MB
    38:06
    Cover

    Disco and drama: The story of Ride on Time

    Daniele Davoli was a DJ playing the clubs of Italy when he produced a song with his band Black Box that would define 1980s house music. Ride on Time became a smash hit in the UK, with its driving beat, catchy piano riff and powerful sample from American soul singer Loleatta Holloway. But that sample would land the band in a whole lot of trouble, especially after they hired a French model to mime along at their live gigs. When word got out, fans were furious.Presenter: Harry Graham Producer: Deiniol BuxtonPicture: Black Box performs Ride On Time on Top of the Pops Credit: BBC

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
    Cover

    Sewing to protest in a Chilean prison camp

    Just two months after Cristina Zamora had given birth to her baby daughter in 1974, she was taken by Augusto Pinochet's security forces and thrown in jail where she found a creative way to cope. Embroidery, knitting clothes and stitching tiny love letters helped political prisoners like Cristina to survive. Afterwards, Cristina didn't discuss her nightmarish experience but over 40 years later when her daughter, Jimena Pardo, saw the prison crafts in an exhibition, Jimena plucked up the courage to ask her mother about her early life. It also gave Jimena an idea for something she knew could help other survivors.The exhibition is called 'Crafting Resistance' and can be seen here: https://warwick.ac.uk/services/library/mrc/archives_online/exhibitions/craftingresistance/photos/Picture: Jimena Pardo and Cristina Zamora with their embroideries Credit: Jimena PardoPresented by Grace Livingstone Produced by Mariana Des Forges

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    23:15
    Cover

    The 'bride and groom of the Syrian revolution’

    Noura Ghazi is a human rights lawyer from Damascus, campaigning for people and prisoners who were forcibly disappeared by the Assad regime. Right at the start of the Syrian uprising, she met software engineer and activist, Bassel Khartabil. Their love blossomed at anti-government demonstrations and on long late night phone calls. Even Bassel’s eventual arrest couldn’t stop them from getting married through the bars of his prison cell. But when all trace of him disappeared, Noura did everything in her power to find her husband. Hers and Bassel's story is featured in the documentary, Ayouni.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Bassel Khartabil and Noura Ghazi Credit: Courtesy of Ayouni / Free Bassel Campaign

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    9 MB
    20:49
    Cover

    The chess game that changed a homeless boy’s life

    Tani Adewumi and his family fled their home in Nigeria under threat from the militant Islamist group Boko Haram. They ended up living in a homeless shelter in New York. It was there Tani discovered a talent for chess. At eight years old, and just one year after he started playing the game, Tani won the New York State Championship for his age group. Tani, his elder brother Austin, his mother Oluwatoyin and father Kayode tell Emily Webb how it all happened.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Andrea KennedyPicture: Tani Adewumi Credit: Micah Kandros

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    10 MB
    22:54
    Cover

    The rebel past of a Tibetan Lama

    Yeshe Losal Rinpoche is a Lama who runs a monastery and Buddhist centre in rural Scotland. As you might expect his days are filled with meditation and contemplation, but life hasn't always been so serene - he shares tales of a dramatic Himalayan mountain escape, dancing and decadence on the New York disco scene and hanging out with David Bowie.

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    20 MB
    43:09
    Cover

    The woman who woke up in the future

    In 2008, Naomi Jacobs went to bed in her home in Manchester as a 32-year-old woman. When she woke the following morning, her world had changed. Overnight, her memories had gone. She didn't recognise her home, her life, or even her child. Instead, she believed she was a teenage schoolgirl living in 1992. And she was utterly bewildered by how she had ended up in the future. She told Emily Webb how the diaries that held the key to her past eventually got her back to the present.This progamme was first broadcast on 8 September, 2018.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufImage: silhouetted woman opening curtains in the morning Credit: p saranya/Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    12 MB
    25:33
    Cover

    The Great Escape of Bonga

    Bonga Kuenda is one of Angola’s most notable musicians, a master of the semba - traditional Angolan music. He was born during Portuguese colonial rule, and before music, Bonga had forged a career in athletics. In the 1960s, he emerged from the shanty towns of Luanda to become the fastest sprinter in the Portuguese Empire, but he was racing for a regime that he despised, one he was secretly trying to bring down. This podcast was first released on 3rd November 2018.Presenter: Harry Graham Producer: Maryam MarufWith thanks to Edward Drummond for the translationImage: Bonga Kuenda Credit: Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    9 MB
    19:47
    Cover

    Surfing and sisterhood - making waves in Jamaica

    Imani Wilmot was born into a surfing family – her father is known as the 'godfather' of Jamaican surfing and her brothers are also avid boarders, so she took to it like a duck to water. She was good too, winning competitions and representing her country with pride. But she soon realised that she was the only top black female surfer at those competitions, and that if she wanted a community around her she’d have to create it herself. Imani spoke to Jo Fidgen about how she set up a surf school for girls and women when she was 17, sharing her confidence and discovering the healing power of the waves.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Imani Wilmot and her daughter Nya Credit: Lucy Jane

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    10 MB
    22:48
    Cover

    The man giving former extremists a second chance

    Noor Huda Ismail believes he narrowly avoided becoming radicalised as a teenager in Indonesia. But he got the shock of his life when he was a journalist covering the 2002 Bali bombings and recognised a familiar face among the suspects – a childhood friend from school. That set him on a mission to understand why and how people end up getting involved in extremist groups. He committed himself to helping de-radicalise former extremists and founded the Institute for International Peace building. He also runs a café in Indonesia where some of his employees are former Islamist extremists - he believes that one of the keys to de-radicalisation is keeping people busy.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Nathan Gower / June ChristiePicture: Noor Huda Ismail Credit: Courtesy of Noor Huda Ismail

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    23:15
    Cover

    The life and crimes of a bearded lady: part two

    After being involved in a shoot out with an undercover police officer outside her home in Philadelphia, BL Shirelle faced years behind bars. But it was in prison where she would meet her future wife, finally embrace her facial hair and find her voice. She tells Jo Fidgen about how a song she wrote and performed while serving time helped her find a way out of a life previously dominated by drugs, crime and violence. She is now the deputy director of the record label, Die Jim Crow and has recently released her debut album.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPhoto: BL Shirelle Credit: Courtesy of DJC Records

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    22:58
    Cover

    The life and crimes of a bearded lady: part one

    BL Shirelle had a talent for writing poetry from a young age. But while she was growing up in Philadelphia, her mother struggled with addiction and eventually BL became involved with drugs too. By 12 years old she was dealing crack cocaine from their home, but she was still writing raps everyday about the things she saw and experienced. She tells Jo Fidgen how one night, when she was 18, she heard a commotion on the street and went out to investigate, only to be caught up in a very serious situation. Part two of her story continues tomorrow.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPhoto: BL Shirelle Credit: Courtesy DJC Records

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    12 MB
    25:34
    Cover

    A Nightmare in Joshua Tree

    Travel writer Claire Nelson was hiking in Joshua Tree, California when she slipped off a boulder and fell 15 feet into a canyon. She was trapped, and completely alone in the scorching hot wilderness, with limited water. How would she survive? This episode was first released on 1st December 2018.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufPicture: Joshua Tree Credit: Ernst Haas/Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    22:57
    Cover

    My life in the eye of the storm

    Born during a hurricane, Russel L. Honoré grew up as a black man in Louisiana during segregation, but he found his calling in the military. He rose through the ranks to become a Lieutenant General, and when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005 he was the man in charge of the joint military and civilian relief effort. Having seen the power and devastation caused by nature during his career, in his retirement he formed a ‘Green Army’ of environmental campaigners in his home state. Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Nathan Gower / June Christie Photo: Russel Honoré Credit: Getty Images / Robert Sullivan

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    10 MB
    22:35
    Cover

    The war story that led to our love story

    Eva and Sami (not their real names) fell in love in Paris over coffee and cigarettes, but Sami could not escape the painful memories of his experiences back home during the Syrian civil war. He’d lost his brother, his home and said goodbye to his family before escaping to France. As she listened to his story, she realised that together they had to write it down. Eva has written a novel called The Stray Cats of Homs, based on Sami’s story. Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Harry Graham Picture: Homs, Syria Credit: Sami

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    18 MB
    39:24
    Cover

    The detective and the diamond heist

    In the late 1990s, Belgian detective Patrick Peys joined the Diamond Squad. Based in Antwerp's Diamond District, this was the world's first police unit dedicated to solving diamond crime. And soon, Patrick would face the most baffling case of his career when a group of thieves pulled off what seemed to be the perfect robbery. They broke into one of the most heavily-guarded vaults in the Diamond District and stole $100m dollars' worth of jewels. It was the biggest diamond robbery in history. No one saw the thieves coming in, or out. But what followed was a trail of strange clues leading to a mysterious criminal mastermind and a school for felons.This episode was first broadcast on 10 March, 2019.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Maryam MarufImage: Diamonds Credit: Olivier Polet/Corbis via Getty Images

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    14 MB
    30:54
    Cover

    The first date that led to a dramatic mountain rescue

    In 2003, Rachel Colenso and her partner went on a first date climbing Piz Badile in the Swiss Alps. What was meant to be a romantic getaway ended up being a disaster when they were engulfed in a fierce electrical storm and trapped on a narrow, icy ledge with little food and water for three days.Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Deiniol BuxtonPicture: Rachel Colenso Credit: Courtesy of Rachel Colenso

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    12 MB
    26:28
    Cover

    The boy, the wish and the nuclear weapons

    In 1986 American teenager, Jeff Henigson, was diagnosed with brain cancer and given two years to live. He had just one wish: to travel to the Soviet Union, meet the country’s leader Mikhail Gorbachev and attempt to broker a nuclear peace deal. This episode was first released on 7th September 2019.Jeff has written a book about his experience called WarHead.Presenter: Asya Fouks Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Teenager Jeff Henigson in bed after undergoing brain surgery Credit: Jeff Henigson

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    10 MB
    22:44
    Cover

    The narcotics cop and a daughter hooked on heroin

    Kevin Simmers devoted his life to the war on drugs as a narcotics officer in Maryland in the US. He spent years sending dealers and users to prison. But when his own teenage daughter got addicted to heroin, he faced a heart-breaking dilemma. He tells Outlook's Jo Fidgen his story and how last year he opened Brooke's House - a rehab facility named after his daughter - to help young women caught up in the opiate crisis.Producer: Thomas Harding AssinderPicture: Kevin Simmers with his daughter Brooke Credit: Courtesy of Kevin Simmers

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    10 MB
    22:51
    Cover

    The barber saving lives one haircut at a time

    When British barber Tom Chapman got his first hairdressing job his manager congratulated him and said "be prepared to be a psychiatrist and a therapist as well as a hairdresser". These words stuck with him when he lost a good friend to suicide. Tom decided to use his barber's chair to get men to open up about their problems. He set up the Lions Barbers Collective, which runs Barber Talk training for barbers all over the world.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: June ChristiePicture: Tom Chapman Credit: Tom Chapman

    ...plus
  • 09.09.2020
    8 MB
    17:47
    Cover

    Conjoined twins can now look into each other’s eyes

    Ervina and Prefina Bangalo were born in Mbaïki, in the Central African Republic, with the back of their heads joined together. Their chances of surviving were incredibly low. By chance, Italian doctor Mariella Enoc was visiting the paediatric ward they were in. She immediately fell in love with the babies and decided to take them and their mum, Ermine Nzotto, to the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Vatican City, where pioneering neurosurgeon Dr Carlo Efisio Marras and a team of 30 doctors and nurses were able to separate them. It took almost two years and three surgeries to complete the separation. In June 2020 the children were finally able to look into each other’s eyes.Presenter: Jo Fidgen Producer: Alice GioiaPicture: Conjoined twins, Ervina and Prefina Bangalo, with mother Ermine Nzotto before they were separated. Picture Credit: Bombino Gesu Children's Hospital

    ...plus