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People Fixing the World

Brilliant solutions to the world’s problems. We meet people with ideas to make the world a better place and investigate whether they work.

Tous les épisodes

  • 23.02.2021
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    24:00
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    Tackling sport’s concussion problem

    Head injuries in sport can have a devastating effect on the brain, which is often only noticed later in life. So lots of people are investigating ways of making it safer to play sports such as American football, boxing and soccer. We look at new technology including smart mouth guards and innovative helmets, and we find out about the latest medical developments that are helping people to combat the risk of brain disease. Produced and presented by Ben Wyatt

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  • 16.02.2021
    12 MB
    25:23
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    Beating superbugs

    A small team of Indian scientists think they’ve found a new way to kill superbugs. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are killing hundreds of thousands of people every year, and that number is going up fast. But one Bangalore-based biotech company thinks they might be on the verge of a breakthrough. Produced and presented by Jo Mathys Picture: Science Photo Library

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  • 09.02.2021
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    23:57
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    How to store power in soil and salt

    Giant towers of building blocks rising into the sky and huge vats packed with volcanic rock or molten salt are being used as massive batteries. They are the latest ideas for storing energy generated by the sun and the wind – so you can keep the lights on when it’s dark or the wind isn’t blowing. We meet the entrepreneurs and scientists who are trying to harness the fundamental forces of physics to power the world. Presenter: Tom Colls Image: The Energy Vault tower (c/o Energy Vault)

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  • 02.02.2021
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    The breath of life

    A clever invention is saving the lives of hundreds of children.Pneumonia kills about 1.4 million children under five every year. Treatment with concentrated oxygen could save many of them, but the machines that provide it need a reliable source of electricity. Some hospitals have frequent power cuts though, which can be fatal.So scientists in Australia and Uganda came up with an innovative way to deliver oxygen when the electricity cuts out.Produced and presented by Ruth Evans.Repeat. This episode was first broadcast on 12 May 2020.

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  • 26.01.2021
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    23:50
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    The spacesuits saving mothers’ lives

    A suit originally designed for astronauts has been adapted to save the lives of mothers who experience bleeding after giving birth. It stems the bleeding, buying time until people in remote areas can get to hospital for treatment. Produced and presented by Craig Langran

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  • 19.01.2021
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    24:59
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    A forest down your street

    Forests the size of tennis courts are being planted in towns and cities around the world. They use a special method from Japan which can grow a dense forest in just a few years. At that size they won’t make much of a dent in global warming but they do have many benefits including bringing increased biodiversity into the heart of the city. Produced and presented by Richard Kenny Picture: Afforestt

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  • 12.01.2021
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    23:49
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    The solutions whisperer

    Dhruv Boruah’s mission is to inspire other people to solve problems facing the planet. What’s more, he gets them to come up with their ideas in just one day. But are their solutions any good and can they survive in the real world? Nick Holland went to Dhruv Boruah’s first solutions event in 2019. Two years on, he tracks down some of the people who were there to see whether anything came of their ideas. Produced and presented by Nick Holland

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  • 05.01.2021
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    Can doughnuts save the planet?

    Imagine a ring doughnut. This is the basis of an idea about how we could run the world in a way that gives everyone what they need - food, homes, healthcare and more - and save the planet at the same time. Economist Kate Raworth, who came up with the idea, explains how it works. And we visit projects in Amsterdam that are using the model to provide food, clothing and sustainable housing. Produced and presented by Anna Holligan.

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  • 29.12.2020
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    24:06
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    What happened next to our problem solvers

    We revisit Lewis to find out how the hydrating sweets he designed for people with dementia have gone into production. We find out how a housing project where residents have to promise to socialise has coped with Covid. And the latest from a pharmacist in the Netherlands - after a setback, her operation to make cheap medication for her patients has started up again. Produced and presented by Claire Bates

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  • 22.12.2020
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    24:41
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    Saving mums and their unborn babies

    Women in a village in Northern Nigeria have come up with an emergency transport scheme that is saving lives. They decided to act when they saw mums-to-be and their unborn babies dying in childbirth because they couldn’t get to hospital in time. Their solution also inspired the state government to help thousands of other women. Produced and presented by Bara’atu Ibrahim

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  • 15.12.2020
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    24:31
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    Making meat in a lab

    Imagine if the meat we ate was all grown in shiny silver vats, with no animals harmed in the process. That’s the vision of start-ups around the world, each trying to perfect lab-grown or cultured meat. It’s a huge challenge in bioengineering to make it work at a cheap enough price. But there are big benefits for the planet if they can pull it off. Presented by Amy Elizabeth Produced by Amy Elizabeth and Tom Colls Image: Lab-grown meat produced by Memphis Meat

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  • 08.12.2020
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    23:59
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    Building with fungi

    Companies are growing light and durable packaging from mycelium that is easy to compost. Another team in Europe is creating a fungal home, which will sense when it’s dark and switch the lights on. And researchers in the UK are developing strains of fungi that won’t just replace plastic, but eat it as well.Produced and presented by Claire BatesPicture: Getty Images

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  • 01.12.2020
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    23:52
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    Perovskites: The future of solar?

    A new kind of solar cell - made by drying a special liquid on a surface - is being heralded as a revolution in solar power.The minerals known as perovskites were discovered more than 150 years ago. More recently, their crystal structure has been copied using other materials and used to produce energy.If it can be made to work, these crystals could be used to literally print out solar cells to put on skyscraper walls, furniture and electrical gadgets.Produced and presented by Tom CollsImage: Olga from Saule Technology

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  • 24.11.2020
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    Riding the solar railway

    Can you make the railways greener by powering trains with energy from the sun? We hear about the pioneering train in Australia that’s run entirely on solar power. Plus we visit the solar farm that’s plugged directly into a railway in Britain and hear about Indian Railways’ big plan for converting to renewable power.Produced and presented by Richard Kenny

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  • 17.11.2020
    13 MB
    27:51
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    From prison to star employee

    Why former criminals are being chosen for jobs at hundreds of companies in a small US city.One boss even tells us that some violent and sex offenders have become her best employees.Produced and presented by Jo MathysPhoto: Getty Images

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  • 10.11.2020
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    23:58
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    Audience takeover: Your questions answered

    Audience members praise and pick holes in solutions we’ve covered. Nick Holland and Kat Hawkins hear the best comments and questions and try to get answers.Among the solutions under review is a story about a man who regrew a rainforest in Ecuador. One listener is worried it’ll just get cut down again when he dies. And eyebrows are raised about nurses in Kenya using motorbikes to rescue snakebite victims.Producer: Nick Holland

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  • 03.11.2020
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    23:59
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    Teenage inventor special

    In this inspiring episode, we hear ideas from high school students in Asia, Africa, Europe and America. They’ve created a new form of sound insulation, refined a forensic process to use at crime scenes, won an award for predicting crop yields and made going to the beach a little safer in the age of Covid.Image: Team Hibla from the Philippines.

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  • 27.10.2020
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    25:27
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    Saving Cape Cod’s dolphins

    The mass stranding of dolphins, orcas and whales is depressingly common. We join a team on the East Coast of the United States who have dramatically improved the survival rates of beached dolphins there. And we are with them as they fight to save a dolphin mother and calf. Plus we look at how Silicon Valley AI tech, and its power to understand dolphin communication, could lead to even more being saved. Produced and Presented by Ben Wyatt Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 20.10.2020
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    24:54
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    How to put the internet in a box

    What happens when you take a little box containing some of the vast knowledge amassed on the internet, to communities that live offline? From a peaceful valley in the remote Himalayas to a bustling Rohingya refugee camp, people are carrying gigabytes of data - from school curricula to the whole of Wikipedia - into places where access to the internet is impossible. Inspired by one of our listeners, we delve into the world of the “sneakernet” - a network of people who carry information to places where the signal doesn’t reach. Produced and presented by Tom CollsPhoto Credit: Getty

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  • 13.10.2020
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    25:31
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    How jellyfish can help us

    Jellyfish blooms can cause havoc, scaring away tourists, clogging up fishing nets, and even getting stuck in power station cooling pipes. But scientists are finding ways to use the creatures to help us solve some big problems. They think jellyfish mucus could filter microplastics from our water systems, and their collagen could help us develop new medicines. And some want to see jellyfish on our plates. Produced and presented by Ruth Evans Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 06.10.2020
    12 MB
    25:52
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    Training police to patrol each other

    A growing number of police departments in the US are introducing a new concept in their training - teaching officers on the beat how to step in when they see a colleague doing something they don't think is right.After the killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests, a programme pioneered by police in New Orleans is being developed for other forces.Presented and produced by Daniel Gordon.Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 29.09.2020
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    23:31
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    Getting rid of AI bias

    It’s not just search engines that are powered by artificial intelligence. From the courts to the jobs market, AI is influencing decisions that have a big impact on people’s lives. But researchers now believe that not all people are treated equally by some algorithms. They’ve found potential bias - influenced by race, class and gender - can have an impact on the decisions that computers make. Some programmers, computer scientists and entrepreneurs hope to fight this bias, using the technology that created it in the first place. Produced and presented by Craig LangranImage: Getty Images

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  • 22.09.2020
    11 MB
    23:37
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    How to prevent drowning

    We hear how AI lifeguards are helping to spot danger on Israel’s beaches, while on Lake Victoria special forecasts for fishermen are saving hundreds of lives. Meanwhile in Bangladesh, community creches and bamboo swimming stages are reducing deaths among children – the group at highest risk of drowning. It’s estimated that 320,000 people around the world die in the water each year.Produced and presented by Claire BatesPhoto: Getty Images

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  • 15.09.2020
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    24:09
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    Smartphones saving the rainforest

    Old smartphones powered by solar panels are being used to catch illegal loggers in rainforests across the world.Each year, more than 150 million mobiles are discarded in the US alone - so we’re looking at clever ways to reuse them. But should we really rethink our consumer habits and keep our phones for longer?Produced and presented by Julie Ball.Photo: Rainforest Connection

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  • 09.09.2020
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    23:54
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    A happier planet

    Looking for the happiest places in the world. We follow in the tracks of someone who gave up his job to cycle round the world to investigate happiness. From Costa Rica to Canada to Bhutan - what are the best ways of bringing about a happier planet?

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  • 09.09.2020
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    23:49
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    Keeping data forever

    Could your family photos end up being stored on a piece of glass? Might you find yourself saving a file to DNA storage? Or downloading a video from a data centre in space?Current methods of storing information are susceptible to decay and have limited capacity but novel approaches could provide plentiful storage so that our selfies outlast our species.Reporter/ Producer William Kremer for the BBC World Service.Picture credit: Southampton University

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  • 09.09.2020
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    24:23
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    Could a device invented in the 1930s help end period poverty?

    Period poverty affects girls and women across the world who can’t afford to buy sanitary pads or tampons each month. So what are the alternatives?In a refugee camp in Jordan, we follow one woman as she tries to get a sanitary pad micro-factory off the ground. While in Malawi, they’re handing out menstrual cups to teenagers.This podcast was first published on 7 May 2019Presenter: Vibeke Venema Producer: Tom Colls(Photo Caption: A menstrual cup / Photo Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 09.09.2020
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    24:37
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    The mums saving each other from a taboo condition

    "Get rid of the girl who smells" - this is the reaction thousands of traumatised new mothers face every year because of a condition called fistula.But in Madagascar some women, who have successfully been treated, become patient ambassadors finding others with the same condition.They personally accompany them to clinics to get life-changing surgery and support.This podcast was first published on 2 April 2019.Reporter/ Producer: Amelia Martyn-Hemphill (Photo: Felicia - a patient ambassador in Madagascar)

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  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    24:06
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    The tech doctors forecasting heart failure

    Monitoring devices implanted in a person’s chest are helping doctors predict if something is about to go wrong with a patient’s heart. Sometimes they can tell a month in advance. It’s allowing cardiologists to adjust treatment and prevent problems before they occur.Produced and presented by Nick Holland.

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  • 09.09.2020
    11 MB
    24:03
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    Prison Voicemail: Messages from behind bars

    The Prison Voicemail app connects inmates and their families, helping them stay in touch throughout a sentence. We hear a mum and daughter using the messages to rebuild their relationship, and find out how it helps children who are separated from their dad. Producer/ reporter Ruth Evans

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  • 09.09.2020
    12 MB
    26:08
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    Financing the forests

    Protecting the rainforest could make people millions of dollars under a pioneering new scheme.Bankers and conservationists have teamed up to regrow a large area of Indonesia’s jungle where endangered orangutans and tigers live.Reporter: Jo MathysImage: An orangutan (Getty Images)

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  • 09.09.2020
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    24:30
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    Life-saving surgery, but not by a doctor

    Nurses and midwives in Ethiopia are being trained to perform emergency operations, saving thousands of lives.People Fixing the World follows one of them, Seida Guadu, as she operates to try to save the lives of a mother and her unborn child.This podcast was first published on 25 June 2019.Reporter: Ruth Evans Producers: Lily Freeston and Hadra Ahmed

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  • 09.09.2020
    14 MB
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    New uses for old solutions

    Two life-saving apps have been adapted to fix problems caused by the Covid-19 pandemic - hear how ideas we’ve visited before have developed and grown.One of them has been helping ambulance drivers find their way to field hospitals; the other has been finding volunteers to run errands for people who are vulnerable.Presenter: Daniel Gordon Reporters: Ruth Evans, Nick Holland and Richard Kenny Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    How to get everyone online

    From balloons in the stratosphere to swarms of satellites in space, the race to get everyone online is heating up.The internet may never be more useful than during the coronavirus outbreak. It provides us with the latest health information, educates our kids and lets us communicate with our loved ones face to face. But only half of the world’s population is online. Tech evangelists around the world are trying to change that. Using balloons and satellites, soon even the most remote areas on Earth will be able to log on. But there is more to getting everyone online than the strength of the signal. People Fixing the World investigates.Produced and presented by Tom CollsImage: Loon

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  • 09.09.2020
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    24:03
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    A future without bees

    Tech companies have developed drones to drop pollen on orchards or shoot it at crops through pipes from tractors.They’re responding to a crisis in insect pollination as studies suggest numbers of both wild pollinators and farmed bees are declining. This could have a serious knock-on effect on how we grow our fruit and veg. But some experts argue high-tech alternatives are a short-term solution to a much bigger and long-term problem.Presented and produced by Claire Bates

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  • 09.09.2020
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    How tech is tackling wildlife trafficking

    New technology is helping in the fight against wildlife poaching. Computer scientists have created a programme that uses artificial intelligence to predict where poachers are going to strike; a new generation of smart cameras is catching the criminals red-handed; and the latest police forensic techniques are being adapted to investigate these crimes. The aim is to put a stop to the illegal trade of wildlife trafficking, which is worth billions of dollars and is threatening the survival of species such as elephants, rhinos and tigers. Each year 20,000 elephants are killed for their ivory, according to WWF estimates. Reporter and producer - Richard Kenny for BBC World Service

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  • 09.09.2020
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    Personality tests for loans

    A short online test that reveals attitudes, opinions and thought processes is being used to help decide whether to give people loans. The idea is to use psychometric tests to give people with little or no credit history a better chance of getting support and investment. New ways of providing financial services are needed because 1.7 billion people have no access to any kind of formal banking facilities, according to the World Bank. Known as the unbanked, they deal only in cash. This can make it harder to reduce poverty, save money or invest for the future. Cheap mobile phones and good network coverage in Nigeria are also transforming the lives of people who previously only dealt in cash. Presented and produced by Anisa Subedar Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    Kids fixing the world

    This week we look at four brilliant inventions by children: a phone app to stop drivers missing road signs; a robot that is activated when a vulnerable person falls over; a tool to help fire departments predict the likelihood of wildfires, and a way to make your fish tank double as a vegetable patch for microgreens.The future engineers and scientists behind these innovations are aged between 12 and 16 and were all entrants in the UK’s Big Bang Competition. Head judge Helena Dodd joins William Kremer to discuss what makes a winning design, and what grown-ups everywhere can do to unleash the problem-solving power of the next generation.Reported and produced by William Kremer.Picture: Freddie with Fallbot

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  • 09.09.2020
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    No more bosses

    Can companies operate better without managers? We hear from people who’ve got rid of managers and say it has helped them do a better job, made them happier and saved money.But there are pitfalls, too. Co-ordination and hiring talent for what are usually considered top management jobs can be a challenge when there’s no traditional hierarchy.Produced and presented by Dina Newman.Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The ancient technology getting a second wind

    Old ships, powered by the wind, are sailing small amounts of cargo around the world again to help cut pollution. Some of them were built more than 100 years ago. The shipping industry moves 80% of traded goods around the planet. But the diesel engines that propel modern cargo ships through the oceans burn the dirtiest type of fuel.Nick Holland speaks to sailors and brokers who, for the sake of the environment, are breathing new life into these vintage vessels. And he hears how new types of sails could get monster-sized modern cargo ships using the wind as well. Producer / Reporter: Nick Holland

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  • 09.09.2020
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    Electricity that grows on trees

    Scientists in Italy have discovered that trees generate an electrical charge every time the wind blows strongly enough to make their leaves touch one another.The researchers, from the Italian Institute of Technology, have managed to harvest enough energy this way to power 150 LED lights from a single leaf.We meet them, and others, who are trying to make use of untapped, natural sources energy.We hear from a project trying to produce electricity from the interaction of fresh and salt water where rivers meet the sea.And we talk to a geologist in Iceland, who’s helped dig nearly 5km beneath the surface of the Earth. At that depth, the temperature can be about 600C - the idea is to mine the heat and turn it into energy. Producer/Reporter: Daniel Gordon Picture: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The breath of life

    A clever invention is saving the lives of hundreds of children. Pneumonia kills about 1.4 million children under five every year. Treatment with concentrated oxygen could save many of them, but the machines that make it need a reliable source of electricity. Some hospitals have frequent power cuts, though, which can be fatal. So scientists in Australia and Uganda came up with an innovative way to produce oxygen by separating it from the rest of the air, using a vacuum created by running water. Then they designed special bags that can store and deliver oxygen – even when the electricity cuts out. Their systems have provided oxygen for hundreds of sick children in Uganda. People Fixing the World hears the story of these remarkable inventions. Produced and presented by Ruth EvansPicture credit: Peter Casamento

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  • 09.09.2020
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    A Sporting Chance

    We all know that sport is great for our health - and if you’re talented it can bring you great riches. But this week we look at how sport is changing lives and giving hope to young people leading the toughest lives. In Cape Town, South Africa, a British surfer noticed how kids from poor townships hardly ever went to the beach. So he started giving them free surfing lessons. Now hundreds go along each week to get “surfing therapy”. Not only is surfing giving them a buzz, it's helping to improve their life chances. In Afghanistan we meet the people who have brought skateboarding to the streets. As well as being an exciting challenge, it’s giving girls in particular a safe place to do sport and changing their outlook on life. And in one of the more deprived parts of London we find out how horse riding - a sport normally associated with the elite - is now inspiring young people from all backgrounds. Reporter/Producer: Richard Kenny

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The great spreadsheet in the sky

    There’s a technology on the block which has the power to change all kinds of things for the better. If that power is harnessed, it has the potential to end corruption, protect your online identity and a whole lot more. Start-up companies and charities are using it in everything from tuna supply chains to medical records and ID documents and everything in between. The technology is blockchain and on this episode of People Fixing the World, we’ll explore whether its great potential can be realised. Produced and presented by Tom Colls Image: Blockchain illustration (Getty Images)

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The farmers moving their fields indoors

    We visit farmers growing lettuce, herbs and strawberries indoors in the middle of cities. The plants are stacked up on shelves in vertical farms that use hydroponics and aeroponics to cultivate them.The idea is to grow food closer to where it’s eaten. At the moment, cities get most of their produce delivered from far away, but transporting it uses energy, while fruit and veg can lose their freshness in transit.We visit two European companies hoping to change the supply chain. One makes indoor farming units for food retailers, restaurants and hotels, and the other grows strawberries in shipping containers on the outskirts of Paris.We find out if these pioneers of European urban farming are able to feed our growing cities.Produced and presented by Dina Newman.Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    25:28
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    Making the world a quieter place

    People around the world are coming up with ways to make the world a quieter place, from portable sound barriers to schemes to stop people honking their car horns.The trouble is that noise from traffic, railways, builders, even neighbours, can have a huge impact on our health and wellbeing, according to the World Health Organization.One of the solutions we look at reduces decibel levels around building sites and music festivals, while another collects acoustic data to help local councils enforce laws if people are being too noisy. Also, a woman in India is doing her bit to reduce noise levels on the streets of Mumbai.Presented and produced by Anisa Subedar Picture credit: Getty Images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The big transport swap

    Robot shuttles and buses on demand are being tested to persuade more people to use public transport. Tallinn in Estonia and Luxembourg have even made travel free.The aim is to tackle the impact of one billion cars on the world's roads, which have brought some cities to a virtual standstill. But in order to tempt people away from their cars new incentives are needed.Claire Bates tries out schemes that are being developed across Europe.Presented and produced by Claire Bates

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  • 09.09.2020
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    Regrowing the rainforest

    It has taken him 40 years, but Omar Tello has turned a patch of exhausted farmland in Ecuador back into rainforest. One of his biggest challenges was repairing the soil. His land was so degraded he had to make enough new soil - from unwanted wood shavings and chicken manure - to cover the entire plot. That alone took about 15 years. He also travelled deep into the Amazon for days at a time, looking for seeds and plants he could rescue. Now his forest is flourishing and the wildlife has returned - it is home to snakes, toucans, monkeys and many other animals. And he is sharing what he has learned to encourage others to protect the rainforests instead of cutting them down. Presented and produced by Jo Mathys.

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  • 09.09.2020
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    The treasure in our toilets

    Human sewage contains lots of valuable nutrients, so should we be recycling it? One of these nutrients is phosphorus, a key ingredient in fertiliser. We need fertilisers to meet the demands of the planet’s growing population, but there is a limited supply of phosphorus. Once it finds its way into the sea it becomes impossible to recover. And yet we all excrete about half a kilogram of the stuff a year, making cities a potentially rich source of the element. In the Netherlands human sludge is already being processed to recover phosphorus and recycle it into a high-tech fertiliser which will not leach into the environment. Reporter: William Kremer Photo: Getty images

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  • 09.09.2020
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    How to be a better dad

    This week we’re in Rwanda, where some men are getting lessons teaching them how to look after their babies. As well as promoting gender equality it's helping to reduce the high levels of violence women there experience at the hands of their husbands and partners. People Fixing the World meets the people taking part and finds out how it works and what difference it’s making.Reporter Lily Freeston Executive Producer Nick Holland(Photo Credit: BBC)

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