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Into America

Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.

Tous les épisodes

  • 14.01.2021
    30 MB
    31:33
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    American Coup

    The storming of the Capitol building by white extremists loyal to Donald Trump on January 6th, was violent, deadly and shameful. But it wasn’t unprecedented. The attempt to overturn Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election follows a long tradition in America of white violence, aimed at undoing Democracy. At nearly every turn, where this country bent toward freedom, there was a violent backlash. And there is perhaps no clearer example than the story of the only successful coup in U.S. history. In 1898, white supremacists in Wilmington, North Carolina carried out a riot and insurrection, targeting Black lawmakers and residents. Inez Campbell Eason’s family survived the coup, but Black lawmakers were ousted, dozens of Black residents were killed, and she tells Trymaine Lee that the impact on the city is still felt. Dr. Sharlene Sinegal-Decuir, African American History professor at Xavier University in New Orleans, explains the long history of white violence in response to progress. In order to prevent insurrections like the one last week in Washington, D.C., she says we must begin to understand our past. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: White rioters at the Capitol got police respect. Black protestors got rubber bullets. Law enforcement and the military probing whether members took part in Capitol riot Democrats grapple with how to impeach Trump without hindering Biden's agenda

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  • 14.01.2021
    2 MB
    02:46
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    A Fresh New Look

    This moment calls for us to be honest and truthful about who we are as Americans, who we’ve been and who we hope to become. And there’s no way to do that without examining the role, range and power of Blackness in America. Trymaine Lee introduces a new look that speaks to the hopes, anxieties and aspirations of Black America.

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  • 07.01.2021
    24 MB
    25:36
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    An Election and an Insurrection

    On the afternoon of January 6th, the nation was gripped by the images of Trump supporters charging the Capitol building as Congress gathered to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win. These scenes brought to bear what so many democracy-loving people across this country have long feared, that Trump’s final days as President would end violently. But hours earlier, attention was on the Georgia Senate races, where Democrat Reverend Raphael Warnock won his runoff election against Republican Kelly Loeffler. Rev. Warnock, the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, spiritual home of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., will become the first Black senator from the state of Georgia. He’ll be the second Black senator from the South since Reconstruction. Jaime Harrison is a Warnock supporter. Harrison ran for Senate this year in South Carolina. He lost his race, but turned his attention to his political action committee, Dirt Road PAC, putting money behind Warnock and Jon Ossoff, who ran for and won Georgia’s other Senate seat. These dual victories mean Democrats take control of the US Senate this year. Jaime Harrison joins Trymaine Lee to reflect on the significance of Warnock’s win and the path forward for Democrats. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: 1 shot dead, Congress evacuated, National Guard activated after pro-Trump rioters storm CapitolLoeffler's projected defeat in Georgia Senate election highlights failed Republican strategy Jon Ossoff defeats David Perdue in Georgia, handing control of the Senate to Democrats, NBC News projects Into the Fight for Lindsey Graham's Seat

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  • 31.12.2020
    25 MB
    26:12
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    Enough is Enough

    As an outspoken sports journalist, Jemele Hill has been told to “stick to sports” in her coverage. The same has been said to professional athletes for decades. But things changed in 2020, when the pandemic and racial justice movements collided. Black athletes decided the fight was worth risking it all for. And many team owners and the leagues realized it was good for business to support their players. Trymaine Lee looks back on the year of sports and activism with Jemele Hill, contributing writer for The Atlantic and host of the podcast Jemele Hill is Unbothered. Jemele traces the roots of why Black athletes stayed silent in the past and why change is more likely to stick in the NBA than the NFL. Plus, why she thinks the solution may be to just burn the whole system down. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Listening: Into the WNBA Bubble Into Protest and the NFL Into a Game Changer

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  • 24.12.2020
    29 MB
    30:29
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    Black Toys R Us

    From children’s books, to cartoons, to the worlds of fantasy and make believe, it can sometimes seem as if Black characters are on the side-lines, or don’t exist at all. Especially around the holidays, Black parents get creative to find toys for their kids that reflect just how beautiful and special they are. More than three decades ago, Yla Eason took matters into her own hands when her Black son said that he couldn’t be a superhero because he’s not white. Trymaine Lee talks to Yla, about why she created Sun-Man, one of the first Black superhero toys in America, and the challenges she encountered along the way. And we get some words of wisdom from Trymaine’s 8-year-old daughter, Nola, on why representation in toys matters. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: Pioneering Black doll Baby Nancy enters Toy Hall of Fame Serena Williams on the Qai Qai doll and wanting to 'share joy' Into an American Uprising: Talking to Kids About Racism

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  • 17.12.2020
    26 MB
    27:54
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    At the Sherman Phoenix, Black Businesses Rise

    The holidays should be the busiest time of the year, but small businesses everywhere have been crushed by the pandemic and its restrictions. The picture is especially grim for Black-owned small businesses, which closed at twice the rate of white-owned small businesses this spring. But in the city of Milwaukee, there’s a bright spot. A collective of mostly Black-owned businesses is not only surviving, it's thriving. For entrepreneurs JoAnne and Maanaan Sabir, envisioning a place where that could be possible began in 2016, following the police shooting of a young Black man that set off days of protests. Two years later, the Sabirs opened the Sherman Phoenix, a community healing space and hub of more than two dozen small businesses. Business owners within the Sherman Phoenix have been able to stave off closures and financial hardship tied to COVID-19. Trymaine Lee talks to Adija Smith, a Phoenix tenant about her journey from home baker to storefront owner, and how she’s relied on and supported her fellow Black business owners within the collective. And Trymaine sits down with JoAnne and Maanaan to talk about how the Sherman Phoenix could provide a model for other Black community spaces, especially during tough times. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: Black-Owned Businesses Nearly Twice as Likely to Close for Good Amid Pandemic: NY Fed What Hasn’t Changed for Black Small Business Owners Since George Floyd Into the Survival of Main Street

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  • 10.12.2020
    30 MB
    31:52
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    Critical Condition

    In Chicago, one of the most segregated American cities, race and proximity to quality healthcare are inextricably linked, and the divide has been exacerbated COVID19 continues to infect and kill Black people disproportionately. At the same time, Black Chicagoans are seeing hospitals in their communities closing at an alarming rate. Since 2018, three hospitals have closed on the South and West sides. And now a fourth, Mercy Hospital, the oldest in the city, is slated to close next year. Host Trymaine Lee talks to activist Jitu Brown, who says Mercy has a duty to remain open and continue to serve the mostly Black surrounding neighborhoods. Etta Davis, a patient at Mercy, says the hospital’s plan to open a new outpatient clinic makes her worried about what could happen in an emergency. But Dr. Thomas Britt of the Health Policy Institute of Chicago, says Mercy, which loses $4 million a month, is in too much debt and serves too many underinsured patients to continue to under its current model. He says elected officials and healthcare providers need to think outside the box to better serve communities. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: Mercy Hospital Announces Closure After Operating for Nearly 170 Years

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  • 03.12.2020
    29 MB
    30:17
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    "The Dead Are Arising"

    Malcolm X is a towering cultural figure. Movies have been made about him, books have been written, and he’s been mythologized since his assassination in 1965. But an encounter at a cocktail party in Detroit led journalist Les Payne to realize how much more there was to understand about the man. Les Payne spent the last three decades of his life learning everything he could about Malcolm X. The result is The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X, a new book that sheds light on the people, places, and experiences that shaped Malcolm X into the man he’d become. Late last month, The Dead Are Arising won a 2020 National Book Award for nonfiction. It’s praise that Les Payne would not live to hear. Payne died in 2018 while still working to put the final touches on his book. So his daughter, Tamara Payne, who had been a researcher with him from the start of the project, finished the work. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee sits down with Tamara and her mother, Violet Payne, to talk about Les Payne, their family’s love for Malcolm X, and the legacies of these two men.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: 'Interior Chinatown' novel, Malcolm X bio win National Book Awards 55 years later, 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' still inspires Malcolm X assassination case may be reopened after Netflix documentary

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  • 26.11.2020
    28 MB
    29:23
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    Food for the Soul

    Like the Blues and Jazz, the Black American culinary tradition is rooted in a specific kind of American experience. From one generation to the next, Black families have turned to traditional dishes to celebrate the holidays, to commiserate and even to mourn. This holiday season, with COVID19 and hunger rising in tandem, too many Black families will be mourning rather than celebrating. Some will be relying on the kindness of strangers to fill their stomachs and their spirits, while others will turn to comfort foods that have gotten us through the worst of times. In the latest episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee talks to culinary historian and author Michael Twitty about the forces that influenced Black American cooking and why food is a source of Black joy. Trymaine also talks to Cindy Ayers Elliott of Foot Print Farms in Jackson, Mississippi, about her mission: using traditional foodways to fill systemic gaps, feed the hungry and keep people healthy this Thanksgiving. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: USDA issued billions in subsidies this year. Black farmers are still waiting for their share. This is what hunger looks like in COVID-19 America Black Farmers Have Been Robbed of Land. A New Bill Would Give Them a “Quantum Leap” Toward Justice.

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  • 19.11.2020
    25 MB
    26:30
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    Kamala Harris and the Rainbow Sign

    Kamala Harris has made history as the first woman, first Black and first South Asian vice president-elect. On the latest episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee explores the little-known history of a place that shaped her identity - the Rainbow Sign. The Rainbow Sign was a Black cultural center in Berkeley, California that opened its doors in 1971 and welcomed the likes of James Baldwin, Nina Simone, Shirley Chisholm, and a young Black and Indian girl from Oakland named Kamala. In her memoir, Harris writes, “Kids like me, who spent time at Rainbow Sign were exposed to dozens of extraordinary men and women who showed us what we could become.” Odette Pollar, whose mother Mary Ann Pollar who founded Rainbow Sign in 1971, tells Trymaine what the center was like during its brief but influential lifespan. And Dezie Woods-Jones, founder and President of Black Women Organized for Political Action, explains how the social and political climate in the Bay Area at the time gave rise to Rainbow Sign, and how the center impacted Harris’ life. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening:Kamala: Next In Line Digital archive of Rainbow Sign Where Kamala Harris’ Political Imagination Was Formed (Slate)

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  • 16.11.2020
    40 MB
    41:45
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    BONUS: Not the Last

    In a bonus for Into America listeners, Trymaine Lee joins Joy Reid, host of the podcast Kamala: Next In Line in a roundtable discussion.Kamala Harris has been elected the 49th Vice President of the United States. So what comes next? Joy speaks with Pulitzer Prize winner, opinion writer for The Washington Post and an MSNBC contributor, Jonathan Capehart, editor at large at the 19th, and MSNBC contributor Errin Haynes and Pulitzer Prize and Emmy Award winner, MSNBC correspondent and host of Into America, Trymaine Lee. Listen and subscribe to the series: https://link.chtbl.com/description-kamala

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  • 12.11.2020
    27 MB
    29:09
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    I Have Your Back

    When Joe Biden addressed the nation for the first time as president-elect, he singled out the Black community for helping him throughout his campaign, and he made a promise. "You’ve always had my back,” he said, pounding on the lectern. “And I’ll have yours.” Host Trymaine Lee takes a closer look at this line from Joe Biden’s speech, first by digging into how Black voters helped push Biden to victory. Brittany Smalls, statewide coordinator in Pennsylvania for Black Voters Matter talks about the work it took on the ground to get Black Americans to the polls. And Eddie Glaude, Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University and MSNBC analyst, unpacks Biden’s promise have the Black community’s back and how voters can keep him accountable. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: How Black voters in key cities helped deliver the election for Joe Biden Credited with boosting Democrats in Georgia, Stacey Abrams looks to January Clinching victory, President-elect Biden declares 'time to heal in America'

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  • 05.11.2020
    30 MB
    31:38
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    The Undecided Election

    Americans were told for months that results from the 2020 presidential election could take days, even weeks, to be confirmed. But there was little clarity on how it would all play out. For the first time in seven months, host Trymaine Lee hit the road for North Carolina, to track the Black vote in this crucial swing state. He found enthusiasm on a college campus, wary determination outside of polling places, and democracy in action as election workers gathered results in the bowels of an old courtroom. But as Election Day came and went without a clear winner, North Carolinians were left in limbo, waiting to find out who their state voted for. And all of America was left wondering which way our country is headed. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Watching: NBC News Decision Desk Live Blog Black men drifted from Democrats toward Trump in record numbers, polls show North Carolina Election Results 2020

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  • 29.10.2020
    26 MB
    27:48
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    Could Black Men Help Flip Florida?

    In order to win the election in less than a week, Joe Biden and the Democratic Party need to do what Barack Obama did 12 years ago: expand the electorate. In 2008, 12 percent voters were people who hadn’t previously been participating, and 19 percent of all Black voters were new to the polls. But in 2016, many of them, including Black men, stayed home. Now, a grassroots effort is building to re-engage these men. Into America heads to the swing state of Florida, where local Black elected officials are leading the effort to reach out to Black men. Trymaine Lee talks with a Miami native, Maurice Hanks, about his ups and downs with political participation over the years. And we hear from Florida State Senator Randolph Bracy, who is using unconventional methods to prove to Black men that their votes have power. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing:'A stronghold of the Democratic Party': How older Black voters could propel Biden to victory Watch: Obama takes hard swings at Trump while campaigning in Florida

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  • 23.10.2020
    22 MB
    23:37
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    Into Getting Black Men to the Polls

    In the last days of the 2020 election, both campaigns are targeting a crucial demographic: Black men. While Black men do vote overwhelmingly Democratic, some polling shows President Trump has made inroads with young Black men and Republicans are hoping to capitalize on that momentum. The Biden team is making a push to get the Black men who may have sat out in 2016, and bringing out former President Barack Obama to campaign in Pennsylvania. To understand why this is a key group in 2020, and game out some scenarios, Trymaine Lee talks with Cornell Belcher, Democratic pollster, NBC News and MSNBC political analyst, and president of the polling firm brilliant corners Research & Strategy. Belcher, who worked on both Obama campaigns, brings his insights on how 2020 is different from 2016, and why the surge in early voting makes predicting this election difficult. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading Trymaine Lee: Democrats would rather mock Ice Cube then grapple with what he represents What's driving people to vote for the first time in 2020? With days left, Black voters face orchestrated efforts to discourage voting

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  • 20.10.2020
    22 MB
    23:09
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    Into Amy Coney Barrett's Record on Race

    Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett faced tough questions from Democrats last week over her positions on abortion, religion, and how she interprets the Constitution. But Judge Barrett’s stances on race deserve attention too. Beyond acknowledging that racism exists, Judge Barrett refused to elaborate on the state of race in the country today, saying giving broader diagnoses about racism is “kind of beyond what I'm capable of doing as a judge.” Janai Nelson, Associate Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund (LDF), doesn’t agree. After analyzing Judge Barrett’s decisions, writings, and speeches, Nelson and the LDF, the nation’s premier racial justice legal organization, are deeply troubled by Judge Barrett’s record on race. As the Senate Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on her confirmation this week, Nelson tells Trymaine Lee why she is concerned about Judge Barrett’s nomination and what a Justice Amy Coney Barrett could mean for future Supreme Court rulings involving race. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further reading: Democrats hint at consequences as GOP moves to confirm Amy Coney Barrett Trump's words haunt Amy Coney Barrett as she vows not to be a 'pawn' on Supreme Court Opinion: A Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett would erase the Constitution's history

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  • 16.10.2020
    29 MB
    30:56
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    Into Intimidation at the Polls

    For months, the Republican party and the Trump campaign have been warning, without evidence, that voter fraud could be a deciding factor in the election. They say they are amassing an army of poll watchers to make sure that doesn’t happen. But election officials and advocates worry these tactics could intimidate Democratic voters, especially in Black and brown communities. Poll watching is legal. Voter intimidation is not. In this episode, host Trymaine Lee explores a time in the not-so-distance past when voter intimidation played a big role in an important election. Mark Krasovic, a history professor at Rutgers University, tells the story of the 1981 gubernatorial election in New Jersey, when the Republican National Committee organized groups of men, some of them armed, to patrol precincts in minority neighborhoods in the name of ballot security. Could the same thing happen in 2020? Jane Timm, NBC News political reporter, joins Trymaine to discuss what we know about the GOP’s ballot security efforts in this election and for a better understanding of what poll watchers can and can’t do. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading: For Trump's 'rigged' election claims, an online megaphone awaits Echoing Trump, Barr misleads on voter fraud to attack expanded vote-by-mail Pro Publica’s Electionland Resource for reporting voting issues

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  • 13.10.2020
    23 MB
    24:38
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    Into the Black Creeks Pushing for Tribal Citizenship

    Rhonda Grayson is the great-granddaughter of America Cohee Webster, a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation. Rhonda can say America’s roll number by heart: 4661. Rhonda grew up aware and proud of her Creek ancestry, but has not been able to enroll as a member of the tribe herself. In 1979, the Creek Nation re-wrote its constitution to change the citizenship parameters so that only people who could trace their lineage by blood could be members. That meant Black people who were the descendants of the Creek’s enslaved population were removed from the rolls. These people were called Creek Freedmen, and until 1979, they were considered members of the tribe. Rhonda is now a founding member of the Muscogee Creek Indian Freedmen Band, a group of Black people working to preserve their families’ connection to the Creek Nation. On Into America, Rhonda tells Trymaine Lee about her fight to be legally recognized as part of the Muscogee Creek Nation. And they talk about her family’s legacy: including her great-grandmother, America Cohee, whose picture you can find as the tile art for this episode. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: Information about the Muscogee Creek Indian Freedman Band Coronavirus takes more than Native Americans' lives. Killing our elderly erases our culture.

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  • 09.10.2020
    33 MB
    35:23
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    Into a High-Stakes VP Debate

    There was a little policy and a lot of politicking. There was at least a veneer of civility. There was a fly. In perhaps the most high-stakes VP debate in history, Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris made their cases to the American public for their running mate. Last night’s debate was the second most watched VP debate in history. Given that both Joe Biden and Donald Trump would the oldest presidents ever inaugurated, and that the President Trump currently has the virus, it’s no surprise that Americans tuned in to see the would-be second in commands on Wednesday night. One of the people watching was Sonja Nichols. Sonja is an outlier in a lot of ways. She’s a Republican businessowner running for State Senate in Charlotte, North Carolina. She’s Black, and she’s a supporter of Senator Harris as a Black woman. But she voted for President Trump in 2016, and Sonja says at the time, she was paying more attention to Mike Pence than she was to Donald Trump. Trymaine Lee sits down with her to talk about how the candidates performed and what shapes her political beliefs. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further reading: Who won the Pence-Harris debate? Experts give their verdict Vice presidential debate 2020: Fact-checking Harris and Pence

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  • 08.10.2020
    19 MB
    20:37
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    Into Trump, Coronavirus and Conspiracy Theories

    President Trump announced that he and the First Lady tested positive for COVID-19 on Twitter, in the middle of the night last week. Brandy Zadrozny spends her days sorting through the chaos of the internet for NBC News, trying to track conspiracy theories and misinformation campaigns. As soon as she heard President Trump had tested positive, she knew the internet would explode. And she was right. QAnon claimed Trump was pretending to have COVID-19 as part of some sort of plan to arrest Hillary Clinton. Other people said he was just trying to get out of the next debate, or maybe even delay the election. On this episode of Into America, Brandy sits down with Trymaine Lee to break down what she’s been seeing online, where she’s seeing it, and why this spread of misinformation matters. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Listening: Facebook bans QAnon across its platforms Facebook removes Trump post that compared Covid-19 to flu Into America: Into the Rise of QAnon During the Pandemic

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  • 06.10.2020
    32 MB
    33:35
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    Into the President's Health and the Public Trust

    Over the past five days, President Donald Trump has been diagnosed with coronavirus, hospitalized at Walter Reed Military Medical Center, and discharged back to the White House. White House doctors and officials gave conflicting report on the president’s health all weekend, and there is still uncertainty about the president’s condition and how infectious he may be. Donald Trump is not the first president to become ill while in the Oval Office, so how can history help us understand what happens, and what’s supposed to happen, when the president gets sick? NBC News Presidential Historian Michael Beschloss can recall a number of presidencies that were shaped by illness and the president’s relationship with the public trust. But this time, he tells Trymaine Lee, “We have never been in a period even remotely like this before." For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing: We need to be reassured President Trump is able to lead: Historian Michael Beschloss 'A big red flag': Trump receives steroid treatment for Covid-19 Trump is leaving the hospital. GOP candidates are still stuck in a box.

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  • 02.10.2020
    24 MB
    25:08
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    Into the Black Doctors Vetting the Vaccine

    For six months, people across the country have been waiting for the same lifeline: a vaccine for the coronavirus. The U.S. government has pledged $10 billion to help drug makers develop and distribute a vaccine in record time through “Operation Warp Speed.” But the emphasis on swiftness has left some people worried about the vaccine’s safety and efficacy. California and New York have said they will assemble their own independent task forces to vet the vaccine, and recently, the National Medical Association, the oldest and largest organization for Black physicians, has said they will do the same. The NMA’s longstanding role as trusted messengers in the Black community could prove crucial, because polling shows Black Americans are less likely than other groups to say they will get a coronavirus vaccine. Host Trymaine Lee talks with Dr. Rodney Hood, an internal medicine physician and health equity advocate in San Diego who came up with the idea for the NMA’s task force. Dr. Hood describes why the task force is necessary, and how centuries of structural racism in medicine has led to generational health issues and heightened mistrust. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing: ‘We are the trusted messengers in our community’: Watch NMA president on MSNBC A COVID-19 vaccine will work only if trials include Black participants, experts say 2 HBCU presidents join COVID-19 vaccine trial — and recommend students do the same

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  • 01.10.2020
    24 MB
    25:16
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    Into the Presidential Debate: Race, Protests and Police

    Tuesday night, Democratic nominee Joe Biden and President Trump met in Cleveland, Ohio for the first Presidential Debate of 2020. For 90 minutes, the candidates debated topics ranging from the Supreme Court to COVID-19, as well as one segment on race and policing. It was during that section that President Trump made the biggest news of the night in refusing to denounce white supremacists. He told the Proud Boys, a violent hate group, to “stand back and stand by.” Trump’s spokespeople have since claimed the president meant to tell them to “stand down,” but that’s not how social media and many Americans heard those words. From a podium six feet away, Joe Biden, who has said he got into the race because of Trump’s Charlottesville comments, had his own past to answer for. He's one of the authors of the harsh 1994 Crime Bill. Biden has since championed policing reform, but he still hasn’t gone as far as many on his left would like and pushed for police defunding. In the debate, he walked a political tightrope with progressives on one side and moderate voters on the other. Political analyst Tiffany Cross is a frequent contributor to MSNBC and the author of Say It Louder: Black Voters, White Narratives, and Saving Our Democracy. She joined Trymaine Lee to unpack the debate. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing: Proud Boys celebrate after Trump's debate callout 4 debate takeaways from last night's Trump-Biden face-off 'Will you shut up, man?': Debate devolves to name-calling as Trump derails with interruptions

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  • 29.09.2020
    23 MB
    24:54
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    Into Expanding the Supreme Court

    President Donald Trump has nominated conservative favorite Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg on the Supreme Court. Democrats are calling on Republicans to follow the precedent they set in 2016, when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused to hold confirmation hearings for President Obama’s pick to replace Justice Antonin Scalia when he died eight months before the election. But Republicans likely have the votes to confirm Barrett, and if they succeed, they will have a 6-3 advantage on the Supreme Court. In response, momentum is growing among Democrats around the idea of expanding the Supreme Court. Host Trymaine Lee talks with Aaron Belkin, a political scientist at San Francisco State University, and founder of the advocacy group Take Back the Court, who has spent the last few years trying to change minds on this issue. He argues court expansion is the only way to overcome the court’s conservative majority to better reflect the will of the American people. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing: Trump Court pick Amy Coney Barrett's past critiques on Obamacare face scrutiny Democrats lament Amy Coney Barrett pick but say 'we can't stop the outcome' Progressives pledge to keep pushing Biden to expand Supreme Court

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  • 25.09.2020
    29 MB
    31:12
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    Into Injustice for Breonna Taylor

    Louisville activist Hannah Drake has been fighting for Breonna Taylor since the 26-year-old’s death in March. As a speaker and author, Hannah helped elevate Breonna’s story on social media, and was part of an effort to push the city council to pass Breonna’s Law – a ban on “no-knock” warrants. The Louisville Metro Police Department had received court approval for this type of warrant in the botched drug raid at Breonna’s apartment on the night of March 13th, meaning they could enter without warning. The orders were later changed for police to identify themselves, but according to her boyfriend, they didn’t. So he fired a shot, and when officers returned fire, they struck Taylor multiple times. For Hannah Drake, the last six months of her life have been focused on holding individuals accountable for Taylor’s death. But this week, a grand jury announced that none of the officers involved would be charged for Breonna’s death. One officer is facing a charge of wanton endangerment for firing into neighboring apartments. Without legal justice, where does that leave activists like Hannah today? On Into America, Hannah sits down with Trymaine Lee to talk about Breonna’s life, and how she plans to honor Breonna’s memory going forward. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further reading and viewing: Ex-Louisville police Officer Brett Hankison charged with wanton endangerment in Breonna Taylor case Breonna Taylor family lawyer blasts grand jury decision as 'sham proceeding' 2 police officers shot during Louisville protests over charges in Breonna Taylor case

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  • 24.09.2020
    15 MB
    16:34
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    Into Restoring Voting Rights for Former Felons

    With 41 days until Election Day, voters across the country are already casting their ballots. But in Florida, thousands of former felons can’t even register to vote. The problem? They’ve served their time, but they haven’t paid the court fees, fines and restitution – and that’s considered part of their sentence. In 2018, Florida voters approved Amendment 4, a ballot measure that would allow those with felony convictions to register to vote, so long as the crime committed was not murder or sexual abuse. The new law made as many as 1.4 million Floridians with felony records eligible to register. But in 2019, the Governor of Florida signed a bill limiting those rights until felons have completed all the terms of their sentences, including the payment of court debts. Many are simply too poor to pay those debts or, because there is no central database of court fines and fees, it is impossible to know exactly what they owe. A federal appeals court has upheld the law, and now, the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition is leading the rush to raise money to pay off as many debts as possible before October 5, the voter registration deadline in Florida. For more than a decade, Desmond Meade cycled in and out of the criminal justice system, mostly on felony drug charges. Now, Meade is the president of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition. In this episode, he discusses the personal struggles that led him to fight for voting rights, the work it took to get Amendment 4 passed, and the current fight to help people pay their fines so they can finally vote. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading and Viewing:Court struggles with felon vote in Fla., case could determine participation in November Ex-felons vote in Florida after overcoming prison — and the GOP ‘You need your voting power’: Florida’s ex-felons fight for their voting rights

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  • 22.09.2020
    26 MB
    27:54
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    Into Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ACLU Years

    When Ruth Bader Ginsburg accepted President Bill Clinton’s nomination to be the 107th justice on the US Supreme Court in 1993, she dedicated the moment to her mother. She said: “I pray that I may be all that she would have been had she lived in an age when women could aspire and achieve; and daughters are cherished as much as sons.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg spent her life facing discrimination because she was a woman: struggling to find work at a law firm despite being at the top of her law school class, and hiding her second pregnancy under lose clothes so she wouldn’t risk her job as a professor. Then, in 1972, she took on a role that would help lay the groundwork to end discrimination for herself and millions of other women. She joined the ACLU as the founding director of the Women’s Rights Project. In 1973 she was named General Counsel of the ACLU, and argued over 300 gender discrimination cases, 6 of which went before the Supreme Court. On this episode of Into America, Justice Ginsburg’s former colleague Kathleen Peratis sits down with Trymaine Lee to discuss Ginsburg’s legal strategy over the years: challenging the law step by step, drawing lessons from the movement for racial justice, and taking on cases featuring men to make the point that gender bias hurts everyone. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further reading and viewing: Morning Joe: 'She worked so hard': Remembering the life of RBG Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87 In Miami, buzz over Cuban American judge Barbara Lagoa as potential Trump Supreme Court pick

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  • 18.09.2020
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    Into Reclaiming Fire to Save the Forest

    It’s hard to comprehend the scale of the wildfires burning across the west. Millions of acres have burned, thousands of homes and structures have been destroyed. Dozens of people are dead and more are missing. Hazardous air quality and apocalyptic skies have forced millions to stay inside. Climate change is a major reason why these fires continue to get bigger, more frequent, and more destructive. But years of fire suppression means the forests are full of overgrown brush, which acts as fuel for these massive wildfires. Native tribes like the Yuroks in far northern California used to regularly burn the land to clear the brush, until the government banned the practice for decades. But indigenous people are reclaiming their traditions of burning the land, and helping the environment in the process. On the latest episode of Into America, host Trymaine Lee talks with Margo Robbins, a Yurok tribal member and president of the Cultural Fire Management Council, about her work in resurrecting the practice of burning to help the land. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further reading and watching: Satellite images show Western fires producing massive clouds of smoke, pollutants Scientists warn climate change is worsening California’s wildfires

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  • 17.09.2020
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    Into Reimagining Mental Health & Policing

    People with mental illnesses are 16-times more likely to be killed by police compared to the general population. As deaths like those of Daniel Prude in Rochester, New York gain national attention, cities are looking for alternatives to using police officers to respond to mental health emergencies. And many cities are turning to a model called CAHOOTS run out of White Bird Clinic in Eugene, Oregon. CAHOOTS stands for “Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets.” The community-based program trains, equips, and deploys mental health providers as first-responders. The name is a nod to the fact that the workers are in “cahoots” with the police, sometimes responding to 911 calls with officers, but often going out on their own, too. The program launched 31 years ago, and they’re increasingly serving as a national model for a better approach to public safety. But they’re also looking critically at their work, and asking how, in the predominately white city of Eugene, CAHOOTS can do a better job reaching communities of color. Trymaine Lee talks to Ebony Morgan, a crisis intervention worker and communications director for CAHOOTS. Ebony walks us through how the program operates, ways they’re trying to improve, and why this work is so personal for her. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading & Listening: Black man died after being restrained by police in Rochester, New York Op-ed: The Rochester police chief resigns after Daniel Prude's death. But that's not the solution. Into America: Into Defunding the LAPD

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  • 15.09.2020
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    Into New Rules for School

    When the coronavirus pushed school online, discipline went with it. Educators have been handing out Zoom suspensions and other remote consequences to keep the virtual class a safe and respectful learning environment. And for those kids who are back in the actual classroom, there are new rules about masks, even about coughing and sneezing. Some experts worry these types of disciplines will have a disproportionate impact on students of color. Before the pandemic, Black students were three times more likely to be suspended or expelled than white students. Overall, Black, Hispanic, and Native children are punished more harshly than white children for similar school infractions. Host Trymaine Lee talks about these concerns with Adaku Onyeka-Crawford, the Director of Educational Equity at the National Women’s Law Center, where she studies discipline in schools and works with educators to come up with better solutions. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Readings ‘And They Cared,’ a report co-written by Adaku Onyeka-Crawford on creating safe learning environments for girls of color ‘Dress Coded,’ a report co-written by Adaku Onyeka-Crawford on how dress codes unfairly target Black girls

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  • 11.09.2020
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    Into a Game Changer

    College football is a multi-billion-dollar industry. So even as coronavirus spread, most schools pushed forward with the 2020 season. But as the pandemic and the racial justice movement exposed inequalities across the country, college football athletes, who aren’t paid for their work and the risks they take on the field, started to speak up. Treyjohn Butler, a senior cornerback at Stanford University, was one of those students. He and other football players from his NCAA conference, the Pac-12, came together under a group called #WeAreUnited and wrote a list of demands that included better health care, racial justice, and compensation for student athletes. On this episode of Into America, Treyjohn tells Trymaine why he thinks it’s the right time to change the way colleges treat their football players. Further Reading: #WeAreUnited statement in the Players’ Tribune 5 ways college football is going to be different in 2020

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  • 10.09.2020
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    Into a Pivotal Election in a Wild Year

    So far this year, we’ve heard the President of the United States say the only way he’ll lose his bid for re-election is if the vote is rigged. He's said he may not accept the results of the election. He’s even suggested that people vote twice. (That’s illegal, by the way...) We’re 55 days out from the election, and this year is shaping up to be a wild ride. President Trump is sowing the seeds of distrust and more people will be voting by mail due to fears of coronavirus. It’s possible we may not know the results of the election by the time we go to bed on November 3rd. Jonathan Allen is a senior political analyst for NBC News. He sat down with Trymaine Lee for Into America to talk about all the ways this election could play out in the days leading up to, and after, November 3rd. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Further Reading & Analysis from Jonathan Allen: There's no vaccine yet. But there's a political fight over it. Trump often sees an American landscape of 'losers' and 'suckers' The quiet part Trump won't dare say out loud

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  • 08.09.2020
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    Into Gettin' Fonky with Wynton Marsalis

    Wynton Marsalis was born into a musical tradition. He grew up in New Orleans, home of the best jazz musicians around – including his father, jazz-great Ellis Marsalis. But Wynton Marsalis is a master in his own right. Back in 1984, when he was just 22 years old, he won two Grammy awards for his performances in jazz and classical music. In 1997, Marsalis became the first jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his record Blood on the Fields. Then in 2007, he released From the Plantation to the Penitentiary and it hit number two on the Billboard charts. Marsalis now works as the artistic director at Jazz at Lincoln Center. That’s where, in 2018, he debuted the work that would lay the foundation of his newest album: “The Ever Fonky Lowdown.” The album is deeply political, narrated by actor Wendall Pierce – a high school friend of Marsalis. And it’s dedicated to his father, who passed away from coronavirus complications this spring. On Into America, Marsalis talks with host Trymaine Lee about his writing process, how politics influences his music, and the magic of New Orleans. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading and Listening: Listen to The Ever Fonky Lowdown here. Wynton Marsalis on racism in the Trump era Wynton Marsalis tells how he's encouraging his students to join the conversation on civil rights Ellis Marsalis, jazz patriarch, dies at 85 after coronavirus diagnosis

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  • 04.09.2020
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    Into Bun B is Standing Up

    Hip hop legend Bun B has been involved in activism in the city of Houston for a long time. So when George Floyd, a longtime Houston resident, was killed by a police officer in Minneapolis, Bun stepped up. He organized a march for Floyd that drew 60,000 people, and he hasn’t let up since, attending the March on Washington and recording a new single about this moment. On the latest episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee talks with Bun B about politics, how his small hometown of Port Arthur influenced his activism, how he's approaching his art in this time. This episode was recorded live in partnership with The Texas Tribune Festival, a streaming virtual event happening all September long. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading and Viewing: Trymaine Lee in Conversation with Bun B for The Texas Tribune Festival March on Washington: Civil rights leaders, families of Black victims rally against police violence ‘I woke up today very proud to be a Houstonian’: rapper Bun B reflects on city’s march for George Floyd

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  • 03.09.2020
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    Into More Than a Coach: John Thompson

    Men’s basketball coach John Thompson, Jr was one of the greats. In his 27 seasons as the coach of the Georgetown Hoyas, he built a weak team into a powerhouse. Under his leadership, Georgetown won seven Big East titles and made it to the Final Four three times, even bringing home a national championship in 1984. He was the first Black coach to win the title. During his tenure, Thompson coached Hall of Famers Patrick Ewing, Alonzo Mourning, Dikembe Mutombo, and Allen Iverson. But he’s most remembered for the man he was off the court. Thompson was widely known as a mentor, a father figure, and an activist -- fighting to make sure his players, especially his Black players, felt supported and had a shot at a quality education. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee looks at the legacy of Coach Thompson. He’s joined by Jesse Washington, senior writer at The Undefeated. Washington also helped Thompson write his autobiography: “I Came As a Shadow,” set for release early next year. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading & Viewing: Read Jesse Washington's article on Thompson in The Undefeated: Georgetown’s John Thompson Jr. didn’t want to be boxed in Michael Jordan issues statement on Georgetown giant John Thompson’s passing One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a struggling Georgetown The Into America team wants to hear from you about what’s happening in your community. Send feedback, questions, and story ideas to [email protected] host Trymaine Lee on Twitter @trymainelee.

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  • 01.09.2020
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    Into Black America's Call to Arms

    The panic of COVID-19 and high-profile Black deaths like those of Breonna Taylor and Geroge Floyd have led to a rise in Black gun ownership around the country. A survey from the National Shooting Sports Foundation found that gun dealers reported a 58-percent increase in Black customers in 2020, the most rapid growth of any ethnic group. Twenty-four-year-old Jeneisha Harris is worried she could be another Breonna Taylor. Harris is a student and activist in Nashville, Tennessee. She grew up anti-gun, but feels vulnerable and wonders if she should arm herself. On this episode of Into America, Jeneisha Harris tells Trymaine Lee about the pros and cons she’s weighing as she decides whether to get a gun. And Lee speaks with Philip Smith, the head of the National African American Gun Association about the long tradition of Black gun ownership, and why he thinks all Black people should be armed. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: Pandemic pushes U.S. gun sales to all-time high The Age of Trump Is Producing More Black Gun Owners

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  • 28.08.2020
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    Into "I Have a Dream"

    On August 28, 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, D.C. More than 250,000 people gathered to hear Dr. King speak from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that day, for the original March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Fifty-seven years later, organizers are taking to the nation’s capitol again. This time, they are calling the gathering the “Get Your Knee Off Our Necks” March on Washington, an urgent reflection on the national uprising against police brutality. In commemoration of that first march, host Trymaine Lee talks with Dr. Clarence Jones, a legal advisor, speech writer, and personal friend to Dr. King. Back in 1963, Dr. Jones wrote the first seven and a half paragraphs of the original speech, and is the only surviving member of the 1963 March on Washington planning committee. Dr. Jones reflects on the racial progress made since that day, and the urgency of the current movement for Black lives. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: March on Washington reconfigured to comply with virus rules What to Know About Friday's Commitment March in DC Rev. Al Sharpton announces march on Washington on 57th anniversary of original event

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  • 27.08.2020
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    Into Being a Black Trump Supporter

    With 68 days until the presidential election, the Republican National Convention is underway. This year, amid national protests against police violence and racism, the convention appeared to make a pointed effort to reach one unexpected audience: Black voters. While many Americans are frustrated with the system, the Trump campaign has outlined a strategy to reach this crucial voting bloc. Black voters are typically seen as one “base” of the Democratic Party. But that doesn’t tell the full story. In 2016, Trump got just six percent of Black votes, according to NBC News exit polls. But he was more popular with Black men, 13% of whom voted for Trump in 2016. Could Republicans expect to do better in 2020? One Black male voter thinks so. Sean Shewmake is a real estate agent and spoken word artist living in Lawrenceville, Georgia, a suburb northeast of Atlanta. He's also a Black man who voted for Trump in 2016 and plans to again in 2020. Shewmake talks with host Trymaine Lee about his experience growing up as a Black man in Indiana, his perspectives on white supremacy in politics, and why he will vote for Trump in November. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: In Detroit, signs of increased interest among Black voters, but concerns remain 'The black man's country club': To understand black voters, look to their barbershops Black male voters need education, representation

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  • 25.08.2020
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    Into the NAACP vs the Postal Service

    If you’re not getting your mail on time, you may not be alone. Cost-cutting measures from Postmaster General Louis DeJoy have created substantial delays in delivering mail in many parts of the US. And with many voters opting to vote-by-mail due to the pandemic, lawmakers are worried these cuts could threaten the integrity of the upcoming election. The House interrupted its summer recess to call DeJoy to testify. DeJoy insisted the USPS is fully capable of pulling off vote-by-mail this election. But many states and organizations remain unconvinced. In a lawsuit filed last week, the NAACP claims the USPS is violating people’s civil rights in a “blatant attempt to disenfranchise voters of color.” And the debate over these changes isn’t just about getting through November. Some measures, like cutting overtime, could also hurt workers. The Post Office has historically been an important ladder into the middle class for Black Americans, and today, its workforce is more than 20% Black. In this episode of Into America, we talk to Jay Thurmond, a veteran Black postal worker about what it is like doing his job in this moment. Trymaine Lee sits down with NAACP President Derrick Johnson to understand what his organization is fighting for in its suit against the USPS. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: Postmaster General DeJoy suspends changes to Postal Service to avoid any impact on election mail House passes bill to reverse Postal Service changes, infuse $25B in emergency funds Concerned postal workers lay blame for delays squarely on recent overhauls

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  • 21.08.2020
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    Into the DNC and Black Lives

    The Democratic National Convention—the first “virtual” one, due to COVID-19—has come to a close. Joe Biden has had his moment in the spotlight to accept the nomination for President, and Kamala Harris has made history as the first woman of color on a major party ticket. Over four nights, the DNC convention featured harsh attacks on President Trump and dire warnings about the future of American democracy; a focus on issues like gun violence, climate change, child care, immigration and the power of women in politics; the voices of everyday Americans; and, featured speeches by many of the party’s “old guard.” But did the Democrats do enough to address the issue of racial justice, and to inspire younger Black voters who want rapid change? On the latest Into America, Trymaine Lee talks to Jamira Burley, one of America’s high-profile Black millennial activists, who was featured in a conversation with Joe Biden at the convention. She supports the Biden/Harris ticket, but she hopes the party will seize on opportunities to inspire many younger voters of color, especially Black voters. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:Read the full speech: Joe Biden's remarks to the 2020 Democratic National ConventionRead the full speech: Kamala Harris' remarks to the 2020 Democratic National ConventionDemocratic convention's focus on racial justice omits policy demands of BLM protestersThe story of Black women in politics: How we got to Kamala Harris' ascent

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  • 20.08.2020
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    Into the Rise of QAnon During the Pandemic

    The vast internet conspiracy theory known as QAnon began in 2017 with a single post to the online message board site 4chan. The beliefs associated with QAnon range from the merely strange to the downright dangerous. Followers believe a ring of devil-worshipping pedophiles run the country and are plotting against President Trump, who they say is here to save the world. They say this Satanic ring includes top Democrats like Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, as well as Hollywood celebrities. QAnon’s beliefs are false, but they’ve seeped into the mainstream; a QAnon supporter from Georgia is likely to be elected to Congress in November. QAnon aggressively pursues potential followers via social media, relying heavily on Facebook’s algorithms, which have often recommended increasingly extreme groups to users who have demonstrated an interest in things like alternative medicine and “energy shifts.” During the coronavirus pandemic, these baseless conspiracy theories are catching on with many people who are stuck at home and feeling lonely and vulnerable. This has serious consequences for the safety of the country; QAnon has pushed anti-mask and anti-vaccination rhetoric during the pandemic.On the latest Into America, Trymaine Lee talks to Ben Collins, a reporter for NBC News who covers disinformation, extremism and the internet. He's been reporting on QAnon for years, and he says we should all be paying attention. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: QAnon groups hit by Facebook crack downHow QAnon rode the pandemic to new heights — and fueled the viral anti-mask phenomenon QAnon groups have millions of members on Facebook, documents show Inside the rise of QAnon-affiliated candidates for Congress

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  • 18.08.2020
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    Into Black Women and the 19th Amendment

    The 19th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified 100 years ago, on August 18, 1920, giving women the right to vote. But like many of the promises in the US Constitution, this was a victory primarily for white people. The suffrage movement was notoriously rife with anti-Blackness. So Black leaders like Ida B. Wells and Mary Church Terrell paved their own way, aiming to undo racism and win voting rights for Black women. As the United States celebrates a century milestone for 19th Amendment, we’re taking a moment to understand the role Black women played in the suffrage movement, and how that political participation has provided important lessons for today. Martha Jones is a legal and cultural historian who studies Black women’s political participation. She’s a professor at Johns Hopkins University, and the author of a new book entitled “Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All.” Jones joined Into America host Trymaine Lee to talk about the generations-long fight of Black women for full voting rights. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:Martha Jones’s book “Vanguard” Women's suffrage myths and the lesser known women suffragists The story of Black women in politics: How we got to Kamala Harris' ascent With Harris VP pick, Black women say Biden has 'decided to write us into history'

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  • 14.08.2020
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    Into Coronavirus and the Classroom: The Biggest Online Learning Experiment Ever

    This fall, millions of American students and teachers will head back to school. In California, for most kids that will mean continuation of remote learning. Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond believes that, if done right, this giant online learning experiment we’ve all been thrust into could revolutionize the future of education. Dr. Darling-Hammond is the President of the California’s State Board of Education and the first Black woman to hold this role. In our final episode of our week-long series Coronavirus and the Classroom, Trymaine Lee talks with Dr. Darling-Hammond about the depth and severity of the digital divide and learning loss, along with the opportunities to close those gaps. According to Dr. Darling-Hammond, the next few months will force California schools to test out new learning models, teachers to innovate, and kids to think and learn outside the box. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading: California school districts brace for an online back-to-school season Where online learning goes next A New “New Deal” For Education: Top 10 Policy Moves For States In The Covid 2.0 Era

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  • 13.08.2020
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    Into Coronavirus and the Classroom: Teachers Swap Chalkboards for Apps

    The debate over whether to re-open schools doesn’t just affect kids. This summer, teachers have found themselves ensnared in a nation-wide fight over school reopenings. In Florida, the largest teacher’s union sued the state over its plans to re-open. In Michigan, teachers organized a protest to stop school buses from leaving lots, raising their voices and signs, pleading summer camps to stay closed. Teachers are crafting mock gravestones. Some teachers have even started drafting their wills. For Adeline Baltazar, a middle-school teacher in San Diego, June was a scary month. But soon after, her district decided to stay fully remote in the fall. In the latest episode in our series, Coronavirus and the Classroom, we look at this unfolding debate through a teacher’s eyes. Host Trymaine Lee talks to Adeline, or as her students like to call her, Ms. A, about the challenges she endured going online in the spring, her relief when school stayed online, and why she is surprisingly optimistic about the fall. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:Educators join National Day of Resistance to fight for safe and equitable schools Some Teachers Head to Virtual Summer School to Learn How to Teach Remotely Schools seeking alternative to remote learning try an experiment: Outdoor classrooms

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  • 12.08.2020
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    Into the V.P. Pick: Kamala Harris

    Joe Biden finally has a running mate: Senator Kamala Harris. The Senator from California is the first Black woman on a presidential ticket in U.S. history. Biden promised to pick a woman back in March, and over the past few months, calls for him to choose a Black woman grew louder. Harris is a moderate choice by Biden, a moderate Democratic candidate. She was District Attorney in San Francisco and Attorney General of California before being elected to the Senate in 2017. Last year, Senator Harris was part of the most diverse group ever to run for president. But despite being an early frontrunner, Harris lost momentum and dropped out before the Iowa caucuses. But not before creating one of the most viral moments of the Democratic primary debates, when Harris criticized Biden for opposing integration efforts in the 1970s. Now Biden-Harris is the 2020 Democratic ticket. Yamiche Alcindor is a White House correspondent for PBS Newshour and contributor for NBC News and MSNBC and she joins Trymaine Lee to discuss the strategy and significance in Biden choosing Harris, and what it means for November. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:With Harris VP pick, say Black women, Biden has 'decided to write us into history' Harris VP pick creates dilemma for Trump campaign, which lobs conflicting attacks Trump says Kamala Harris 'nasty' and 'disrespectful' to Joe Biden, surprised by VP pick

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  • 11.08.2020
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    Into Coronavirus and the Classroom: Parents Get Ready for School, At Home

    All over the country, policymakers, parents, and teachers are hotly debating whether to bring kids back to school. President Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy Devos have insisted that schools must reopen, while major teacher unions are threatening to strike if schools reopen without adequate safety measures. But for more than 4 million American students, their back-to-school plans are sealed. At least 17 of the 20 largest school districts across the country have decided to go fully remote this coming fall. That includes the San Diego Unified District, which serves more than 100,000 students. This week, we’re heading to San Diego as part of a week-long series, Coronavirus and the Classroom, to understand how the decision to stay online is affecting the local community. Trymaine Lee sits down with Kirsten Reckman, a frustrated working mom who is trying to figure out how to juggle work and childcare, all while making sure her 2nd grade son stays engaged and doesn’t fall behind this fall. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:As coronavirus closes schools, teachers and families brace for massive experiment in online educationLos Angeles and San Diego Schools to Go Online-Only in the FallReopening schools: Will in-person classes, online learning or a mix be the solution?Many parents want it; few can afford it. Amid school uncertainty, private tutoring ramps up.

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  • 07.08.2020
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    Into the End of the $600 Unemployment Check

    Last week, many Americans got their last $600 unemployment check from the federal government. In Washington, Congress is at odds over whether to extend those benefits.Meanwhile, unemployed Americans are now struggling to make do with less. According to an early study from the University of Chicago, two out of every three people qualified to receive the $600 extra would make more money unemployed than at their regular jobs. In Stockton, California, a chef named Selena Pollack was one of those people. While collecting unemployment, she was able to provide for her family and pay off debt. But COVID-19 cases in that county, San Joaquin, are currently some of the highest in the country, and without federal assistance, she doesn’t have enough money to pay her bills.Michael Tubbs, the Mayor of Stockton, argues this reveals how little we value work in this country. And he wants to change that. In January 2019, Tubbs started a pilot program guaranteeing a basic income to some Stockton residents. 125 people started receiving $500 a month, no strings attached. In the pandemic, that support has been more critical than ever. He thinks other cities could follow suit. Trymaine Lee talks with Selena Pollack about what it’s like to be jobless during this pandemic. And we hear from Mayor Tubbs who says now is the time to rethink what it means to make a living wage in America. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading and Viewing: Contours of coronavirus aid deal between Democrats, White House take shape $600-a-week unemployment benefits expire, posing fresh danger to Trump's re-election What would you do with $500 a month? Stockton pilots universal basic income program Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs calls for addressing 'the violence of poverty' Is this California city the blueprint for Universal Basic Income?

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  • 06.08.2020
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    Into Joy Reid’s Primetime Moment

    Growing up, Joy Reid loved to watch the news with her mother – and even remembers staying up late to watch coverage of the Iran Hostage Crisis as a middle schooler. Along the course of her career, Joy’s worked in local news, as a press secretary for the 2008 Obama campaign, and written books on American politics.And she recently became the host of a new primetime show on MSNBC: The ReidOut, which premiered on July 20th with big-name guests such as Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden. More than 2.5 million people tuned in.This is Joy’s third show for MSNBC. She previously hosted an afternoon show called The Reid Report and AM Joy, which aired on weekends. With The ReidOut, Joy is now the first Black woman to host a national primetime news show since PBS NewsHour’s Gwen Ifill died in 2016, and the first Black woman to anchor a primetime network show in the history of cable TV.On Into America, Reid tells Trymaine Lee what led to this moment, and how she plans to make the most of it. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading & Viewing: The Reid Out airs weekdays at 7pm ET Joy Reid to host 'The ReidOut ' weeknights on MSNBCChris Matthews announces retirement, mutually parts ways with MSNBC

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  • 04.08.2020
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    Into the Future of HBCUs

    For more than 150 years, Howard University in Washington, D.C., has graduated high-profile alumni like former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, authors Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison, and rapper Sean Combs. Like many Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in recent years, Howard has faced dwindling enrollment and financial uncertainty. But renewed calls for social justice might be shifting that.Last week, Mackenzie Scott, a philanthropist and ex-wife to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, announced she was donating $1.7 billion dollars to charitable causes, with tens of millions of dollars going to six prominent HBCUs. Howard University is one of them. It received $40 million. It is the largest gift from a single donor in the school’s entire 153 history.Dr. Wayne Frederick, President of Howard University and an alum himself, believes that HBCUs, founded before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to serve primarily Black students, are in a unique position to respond to this historic moment. Host Trymaine Lee talks with Frederick about the financial uncertainty of running an HBCU and how the Scott gift will have an impact, how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting life on campus, and what the future may hold for all HBCUs, including Howard. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:Pandemic ushers in 'new normal' for historically underfunded HBCUs Howard University receives largest gift in its history for STEM scholars programEnrollment declines threaten future of HBCUs, disheartening alumni

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  • 31.07.2020
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    Morgan Freeman Reads the Last Words of John Lewis

    The late Civil Rights icon and Georgia Congressman John Lewis was laid to rest on Thursday. But he had one final thing to say. John Lewis’ last words appeared in The New York Times on Thursday in an essay titled “Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation.” John Lewis wrote the essay shortly before his death and requested that it be published on the day of his funeral. In this bonus episode of Into America, Academy Award winning actor Morgan Freeman reads the final words of his friend John Lewis. This reading was recorded for MSNBC’s The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.Further Reading:Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation Watch: Morgan Freeman Reads John Lewis’ Last Words Into America: Into Remembering John Lewis

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