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Business Daily

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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  • 16.01.2021
    23 MB
    49:26
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    Business Weekly

    It’s been a week in which the US president, Donald Trump, was suspended from his social media accounts and the social network Parler was taken offline. On Business Weekly, we explore the role these companies have in society and whether they facilitate free speech and cohesion, as they claim. Plus, the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt speaks to Tesla founder Elon Musk about money, electric cars and populating other planets. And it probably feels like a lifetime ago that any of us went to a cinema to watch a film, popcorn in hand. Will they ever return? Our reporter Vincent Dowd hears from the world's most northerly movie theatre about its struggles during the pandemic. And should you do what you love, or love what you do? We speak to pianist who ditched his passion to become an accountant. Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma.

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  • 15.01.2021
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    Who owns colour?

    Scientists, artists and some of the world’s biggest companies are carving up the visual spectrum, and claiming certain colours as their own, so who does have a right to use the colours of the rainbow? We explore the ongoing rift over the worlds “blackest black” Vantablack, which was created by engineering firm Surrey Nanosystems, and can only be used by the artist Anish Kapoor. Contemporary British artist Stuart Semple argues that creativity should not be limited by commercial agreements, while Surrey Nanosystems executive Ben Jensen explains that the material is not suitable for general use. Author Kassia St Clair explores the meaning and history of colour, and we hear how interpretations of colour have changed from Julie Irish, an assistant professor specialising in colour, at the College of Design in Iowa. Note: Surrey NanoSystems has clarified their material Vantablack isn’t toxic, as described by one speaker in this programme, but can be an irritant.(Picture of a colour splash via Getty Images).

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  • 13.01.2021
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    Should Trump be banned from social media?

    President Trump's ban from various social media raises the question of their regulation. Are they right to ban him, and what are the implications? We ask Nancy Mace, a newly elected Republican representative of South Carolina. Cory Doctorow, blogger, author and activist in favour of liberalising copyright laws, says that Apple and Google can't blame inadequate moderation for their banning of social network Parler on their platforms. And we hear from Professor Shoshana Zuboff, author of a book The age of surveillance capitalism, who thinks the law will bring the beginning of the end of 'Big Tech'. .(Picture: Trump's Twitter profile showing the account is suspended. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 12.01.2021
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    Forced labour in supply chains

    China is forcing hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other minorities into hard, manual labour in the vast cotton fields of its western region of Xinjiang, according to BBC reports. As a result, apparel companies are facing mounting pressure to withdraw from economic ties with the region, and certainly to stop buying cotton from there. Chloe Cranston of UK-based Anti-Slavery International lays out the case for why companies need to avoid Xinjiang. But as we’ll hear from Andrew Morgan of veteran thread supplier Coats, even though the moral imperative is there, the apparel industry is not completely unified in motivation for change. And we’ll hear from two companies, boutique fashion brand Eileen Fisher and global furniture mainstay IKEA, on their efforts to have an ethical supply chain.Producer: Frey Lindsay(Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 12.01.2021
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    Choosing a career: Don't follow your passion?

    When it comes to choosing a career, should you do what you love or learn to love whatever you do? A clip of Professor Scott Galloway of NYU Stern Business School saying "don't follow your passion" recently went viral. He tells us why you're better off finding something you're good at - and getting very good at it. Someone who did just that is Farid Gasanov. Instead of becoming a professional pianist and composer, he chose accountancy. But he now has his own firm and has time to compose pieces, and play them on the piano he has been able to afford.(Picture: Farid Gasanov playing his piano. Credit: Farid Gasanov.)

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  • 09.01.2021
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    49:26
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    Business Weekly

    In the week when a mob stormed the US Congress, Business Weekly examines the enormous task now facing President-elect Joe Biden. How will he unite the country and how will the new balance of power in Congress affect his economic agenda? Mr Biden’s campaign slogan was “Build Back Better” - we’ll ask whether the world will rise to the task of creating more equal societies once the pandemic is over. Nobel Prize winner Sir Angus Deaton says it’s possible. We’ll also get the secret to a good night’s sleep and hear why women are once again allowed to drive Moscow’s subway trains. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 08.01.2021
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    What makes Elon Musk tick?

    Elon Musk, the space pioneer and electric car guru, now ranks as one of the world's richest men, thanks to a surge in the value of shares in his company Tesla. In an interview from 2014, he tells the BBC's chief environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt what drives him to take on some of the world's most technologically challenging projects, and how he feels about the wealth he's accumulated over the years.

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  • 07.01.2021
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    Can the Democrats make economic change?

    The Democrats and President-elect Biden have won control of the US Congress after results came in from two elections in Georgia. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff defeated Republican incumbents Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue respectively. Mr Biden will have a much better chance now of pushing through his legislative agenda. We'll hear from former President Obama's top economic adviser Jason Furman, about how this might shape the country's economic future, while Chris Low of FHN Financial in New York gives us Wall Street's reaction. We'll also be joined live by entrepreneur and former economic adviser under President Bush, Pippa Malmgren to discuss the night of violence seen in the country's capitol buildings.Producer: Frey Lindsay.(Image: A voter leaves a polling station on January 5, 2021 in Marietta, Georgia. Image credit: Getty Creative.)

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  • 06.01.2021
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    Predicting the future of retail

    With much of the world going back into stringent lockdowns and people warned away, or even outright banned, from physical stores and malls, some observers are suggesting this might be the moment online retail takes the dominant position. Others, however, say this is just the last of a long line of challenges for high street retail, and they’re not giving up without a fight. We’ll hear from branding consultant and futurist Karinna Nobbs as well as the self-styled “Retail Prophet” Doug Stephens.(Image credit: Getty Creative)

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  • 05.01.2021
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    “Remote working” in the Indian Ocean

    Pip Hare is currently sailing solo round the world in the Vendee Globe race, one of only a handful of women to attempt it. She speaks to the BBC’s Zoe Kleinman from the middle of the Indian Ocean, while preparing for a storm. We’ll hear about coping with isolation, the challenges of sleeping in 30 minute bursts, and why Pip was so committed to her teenage dream of becoming a professional sailor.(Picture credit: Pip Hare)

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  • 04.01.2021
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    Thinking global, acting local

    Lessons in rethinking the climate emergency from Sierra Leone and the US. We hear from mayor of Freetown Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr on her plans to plant a million trees, and make climate change relevant to the citizens of the rapidly urbanising capital city. Harvard’s Rebecca Henderson argues that capitalism can provide at least part of the solution, and companies need to price in climate damage, making them financially accountable.(Image credit: Getty Images)

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  • 02.01.2021
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    Business Weekly

    The UK has given the green light to the Oxford AstraZeneca Covid19 vaccine. It’s cheaper and easier to store than some of the alternatives - and the hope is that will make it easier to distribute globally. However, there are worries that production capacity and an unwillingness to share intellectual data might mean the poorest in the world won’t get the immunisation. We speak to Anna Marriott of Oxfam. Also on the show we’ll be mulling over the Brexit deal. We get the view from businesses both sides of the Channel about what the future will bring now the UK and EU have a new trade relationship. We also hear from former EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom who tells us what effect the divorce will have on the rest of the union. As the rest of the world continues to struggle with Covid 19, China is getting back to normal. We hear from Wuhan and Shanghai. Plus, food businesses discuss how they’ve adapted to survive during the pandemic. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Clare Williamson. (Image:University of Oxford researcher in a laboratory at the Jenner Institute, working on the coronavirus vaccine. Image credit: John Cairns/University of Oxford/PA Wire)

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  • 01.01.2021
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    UK completes separation from European Union

    A new era has begun for the United Kingdom after it completed its formal separation from the European Union. The UK stopped following EU rules, as replacement arrangements for travel, trade, immigration and security co-operation came into force. On today's programme, we'll hear how we got to this point with Marie Keyworth, and then Vivienne Nunis will tell us what's happening today. Then, Dr Anna Jerzewska, Director of the trade consultancy Trade and Borders and Allie Renison with the Institute of Directors will discuss the UK's trade opportunities in the future.Producer: Frey Lindsay.(Picture credit: Reuters.)

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  • 31.12.2020
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    Millennial money management

    What are the realities and responsibilities of young people when it comes to financial planning in a pandemic? Elizabeth Hotson talks to millennials who are trying to manage their money in one of the toughest economic periods since the financial crisis. We hear from Gaby Dunn, host of the Bad with Money podcast; journalist Ebony-Renee Baker who’s planning for herself and her family and Nick Hatter, a life coach who says younger people are far more fiscally responsible than they’re given credit for. (Picture of cash via Getty Images).

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  • 30.12.2020
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    Casual dining in a pandemic

    Necessity is the mother of invention and Elizabeth Hotson finds out how restaurants and other food outlets - some of the most obvious casualties of the pandemic - have adapted to survive in 2020. We hear from Michael Ward, managing director of Harrods department store on how it’s looking to a domestic clientele to make up for the lack of overseas tourists, whilst JP Then, co-founder of Crosstown Doughnuts tells us how companies are incentivising their workers with his sweet treats. Briony Raven, Pret’s UK Food & Coffee Director explains how the high street chain had to learn new tricks and Thom Elliot from Pizza Pilgrims describes sending his products by post. Nicole Ponseca, founder of Jeepney in New York tells us about the ups and downs of a fraught 2020 and Dominic Allport from the NPD Group gives us the cold, hard figures. Produced by Sarah Treanor. (Pic of Regent Street in London by Elizabeth Hotson).

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  • 29.12.2020
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    Lockdown lunches

    How have our eating habits changed during a year when lockdowns have seen more of us cooking from home and fewer of us sharing meals out with colleagues? And can Zoom calls replace the networking coffee or dinner? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to one-time office workers for whom eating out was just part and parcel of life. Justin Urqhuart-Stuart, co-founder of Regionally casts doubt on the ability of remote working to replicate a true deal-making environment and Dominic Allport, an insight director at the NPD group tells us about the financial impact of the shifts in eating habits. Produced by Sarah Treanor. (Picture of takeaway food via Getty Images).

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  • 28.12.2020
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    What’s next for China?

    China is bucking a global trend and its economy is growing again. We hear from Wuhan and Shanghai, where restrictions have been lifted and companies are back in business. But the scars left by Covid-19 are still evident. We’ll also ask how ready China is for the challenges of 2021. The world’s second biggest economy is spending huge amounts on green technologies and clean power. Presenter Fergus Nicoll talks to Dr Sha Yu, Co-Director of the China Programme at the University of Maryland’s Centre for Global Sustainability, and Stefan Gsänger, Secretary-General of the World Wind Energy Association. Fergus is also joined by Yuan Yang, deputy Beijing bureau chief at the Financial Times and independent economist Andy Xie in Shanghai.(Picture: A worker in North China's Hebei Province, Dec. 17, 2020. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 26.12.2020
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    Business Weekly

    This week the roads running to the ports in the South East of England turned into a lorry park when continental Europe blocked arrivals from the UK– so Business Weekly takes look at trade and the travails of the global shipping industry. How has this vital sector fared during the pandemic? As France bans discrimination against regional accents we’ll ask whether the way you talk really affects your job pospects. The Chief Executive of the Royal Albert Hall tells us how this historical London venue is coping without box office sales - and we'll hear from the entrepreneurs who set up new businesses in the middle of a pandemic.Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Clare Williamson.(Image: Lorries parked at Manston airpot while port of Dover closed Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 25.12.2020
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    Will cities ever be the same?

    This year has seen our cities coming under pressure as they struggled to withstand the impact of the coronavirus. City centres were deserted as shops shut and people stayed away. But in some city streets there was a new community spirit as people faced the pandemic together and supported neighbours they'd never met before. In this programme, Tamasin Ford investigates what the future could be for our cities, and asks how they need to change if they are to survive, and even flourish. We hear from architect Siri Zanelli; the mayor of Bristol in the south-west of England, Marvin Rees; transport planner Susan Claris; Singapore-based Lauren Sorkin, the head of the Resilient Cities network; Liu Qian of Greenpeace in Beijing, and Rosamund Kissi-Debrah who has been a campaigner for better air quality since the death of her daughter from asthma in 2013.(Image: Mumbai skyline in lockdown March 2020. Getty Images.)

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  • 24.12.2020
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    Brexit talks continue ahead of likely deal

    Talks between the UK and the EU on a post-Brexit trade agreement continued during the night, but a deal is expected to be unveiled on Thursday. Negotiators in Brussels are said to be trying to finalise details on fishing quotas, which have proved an obstacle to an agreement during months of talks. On the programme we'll hear from Sally Jones, Brexit lead at Ernst and Young, Charles Grant at the Centre for European Reform, as well as the BBC's Political Correspondent Rob Watson.(Picture credit: Reuters)

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  • 23.12.2020
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    Cargo shipping in the pandemic

    How the shipping industry has fared in 2020. Ed Butler speaks to Lars Jensen from SeaIntelligence Consulting about the ups and downs of the shipping industry during the pandemic, in a year that has seen a collapse in economic activity, but a boom in online shopping. And Bridget Rosewell, commissioner for the independent National Infrastructure Commission in the UK, explains why disruption to supply chains could cause businesses to rethink the way they ship goods around the world.(Photo: A cargo ship is unloaded at the UK port of Felixstowe, Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 22.12.2020
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    Has the time come for a 4-day working week?

    Unilever in New Zealand is the latest firm to trial a 4-day week without cutting pay. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Paddy Gamble, the CEO of Perpetual Guardian which manages trusts, wills and estate planning. A couple of years ago they put their 240 staff on a four-day week but paid them for five. He says productivity has gone up since they introduced it. Charlotte Lockhart runs a global campaign for a 4-day week and she says its easy to do and its doesn't cost very much. But Marc Effron, president of The Talent Strategy Group, a global human resource management consultancy firm says a four day week doesn't actually improve productivity.(Picture credit: Getty Creative)

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  • 21.12.2020
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    Selling Christmas in 2020

    How do brands strike the right tone in their Christmas adverts when many consumers have taken a financial hit? Elizabeth Hotson goes on an advertising odyssey and talks to Sarah Traverso, Group Director of Integrated Marketing and Content for Coca-Cola in the US, a company so central to Christmas advertising that some think Coca Cola invented Santa Claus. A myth quickly debunked by Ann Christine Diaz, the creativity editor at Advertising Age. What is the secret behind a successful Christmas campaign? A question for Simon Lloyd from DentsuMB, who was until recently the creative director of the advertising agency behind the John Lewis department store Christmas adverts. Global advertising spend is expected to contract by 10% ( $63bn) this year and with people spending so much time at home during the pandemic, the focus has gone to online advertising and social media, as James McDonald, Head of Data at the World Advertising Research Center, explains.(Photo: socially-distanced Santa Claus in a mask in New York City, Getty Images)

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  • 19.12.2020
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    Business Weekly

    On Business Weekly this week, we examine the potential big trouble for Big Tech. Regulatory bodies around the world are looking to tighten the rules that govern the digital world. Concerned by issues relating to both the web content and the business conduct of some of the big technology companies, legislators from the US to the EU are trying to re-write the digital laws. We look at what this could mean in practice for Silicon Valley. We also look at dry ice – how it works and the important role it will carry out in the distribution of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine, as well as the possible implications that could have for drinks industry. Plus, while Zoom business meetings are all the rage now, how long before virtual reality takes them to the next level? And we discuss the joy of traditional Christmas correspondence and find out why young people are starting to send greetings cards again. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 18.12.2020
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    Cannabis in the USA: An illegal tax-paying business

    America’s cannabis industry is worth tens of billions of dollar and it generates tax revenues and jobs. But it is barred from accessing most financial services. This is because, while legal in an increasing number US states, cannabis remains illegal at a federal level. We hear what it’s like running a cannabis business from Ken Churchill of the West Coast Cannabis Club in California. Emily Dufton, author of Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America, explains how the US went from "Just Say No" in the 1980s to yes now. And Robert Hoban, a lawyer who specialises in cannabis, explains why two currently empty Georgia Senate seats could determine whether the Biden administration can fulfil its pledge to decriminalise cannabis.(Picture: purchasing legal marijuana at a dispensary. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 17.12.2020
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    The monopoly case against Facebook

    Why US regulators want to break up the social media giant. The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and dozens of US states are arguing that Facebook is a monopoly that harms consumers. Ed Butler speaks to tech and anti-trust researcher Dina Srinivasan about why data privacy is at the centre of the arguments over Facebook's monopoly power. Former FTC chairman Bill Kovacic explains why breaking up the social media giant is still a distant possibility. And the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones discusses the rising anti-tech sentiment among both US and European regulators.(Photo: Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram logos. Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 16.12.2020
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    Meeting in the virtual world

    Could virtual offices provide an alternative to endless Zoom calls? Ed Bulter speaks to Jeremy Bailenson, director of Stanford University's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, about the phenomenon of 'Zoom fatigue', and why virtual reality could provide a solution. Phillip Wang, CEO of the startup Gather, shows us round his virtual office platform that combines video conferencing with old-school video game graphics. Ed tries out a meeting in virtual reality with Anand Agarawala, CEO of the VR platform Spatial. And Marc Bena from PwC explains why interest in virtual meetings is growing among businesses.(Photo: A virtual meeting on VR platform Spatial, Credit: Spatial)

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  • 15.12.2020
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    Trusting the algorithm

    Artificial intelligence is increasingly part of our daily lives - in health, in transport, entertainment and much more - but how many of us actually trust the algorithms that drive it? Rolls-Royce says it’s now developed a system, called the Aletheia framework, that gives IT engineers in any sector a way of testing whether their AI systems are making decisions that are safe and trustworthy. The aerospace company says it's making the framework available for free to all. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Caroline Gorski from Rolls-Royce who helped develop the Aletheia framework. She also speaks about AI's trust issues with Dame Wendy Hall, Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton in the UK and Chair of the Ada Lovelace Institute. Plus Pag Miles from the global recruitment company Alexander Mann Solutions, explains how the Aletheia framework might help his industry which is increasingly relying on AI to select and match candidates to jobs.

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  • 14.12.2020
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    Still no Brexit trade deal

    Negotiators from the UK and EU are to begin a new push to reach agreement on post-Brexit trade after both sides agreed "to go the extra mile". A UK source said the "process still has some legs" but Boris Johnson has warned a no-deal is the "most likely" outcome. Sophie Pornschlegel, a senior policy analyst at the European Policy Centre, explains how much room there may be in Brussels' position, while the BBC's Rob Watson talks through what will be needed to get any deal over the line in the UK parliament before the 31st. And we'll hear from a UK coffee exporter, Dan Webber of Chimney Fire Coffee in Surrey, about what the prolonged uncertainty means for his business.(Picture: Getty Images)

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  • 12.12.2020
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    Business Weekly

    On this edition of Business Weekly, we ask whether Covid vaccines are the shot in the arm the pharmaceutical industry needs to rescue its reputation? Plus, as the world looks ahead to life after the pandemic will our transportation systems be there to help us get around? There’s a financial crisis in New York’s mass transit system. What does that mean for the city it supports? Airbnb finally packs it bags and heads to the stock market. The holiday accommodation company’s shares boomed on its first day of trading this week. We speak to Airbnb’s chief executive, Brian Chesky. Also, in China, over 15m tonnes of food is wasted every year. The government has a new plan to tackle this, but how will it convince its citizens not to throw food away? And we’ll be talking about that nine figure deal reached by Bob Dylan to sell off his back catalogue. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 11.12.2020
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    Can post-Brexit Britain ban live animal exports?

    Britain is looking to ban the export of live animals for slaughter and fattening after its existing trade arrangement with the European Union lapse at the end of this year. Natasha Smith of Compassion in World Farming, who have campaigned on this for decades, explains why they’re against the practice. Meanwhile UK minister Craig Mackinlay says leaving the EU’s trade rules after Brexit is key to getting the ban implemented. But will the ban run afoul of WTO free trade rules? Emily Rees of consultancy Trade Strategies breaks down the rules and whether the ban fits. But what do UK farmers think? Phil Stocker of the National Sheep Association says this ban overshoots, and puts farmers already in an unclear position because of Brexit, even more on the back foot. And Francesca Porta of the Brussels-based Eurogroup for Animals explains what changes might be coming in the EU itself on live animal transport.Producer: Frey Lindsay.(Image credit: Getty Images)

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  • 10.12.2020
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    Brexit: 'Large gaps' remain after trade talks

    Boris Johnson's dinner with EU chief Ursula von der Leyen - aimed at breaking the Brexit trade deadlock - has ended without agreement. The BBC's Laura Kuenssberg said the evening had "plainly gone badly" and the chances of the UK leaving the post-Brexit transition period at the end of the year without a firm arrangement was a "big step closer". What would that mean for the UK, and the rest of the world? Joining the programme live will be BBC World Service political correspondent Rob Watson, and Dr Anna Jerzewska, Director of the trade consultancy Trade and Borders.

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  • 09.12.2020
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    Big Pharma: Vaccine Heroes or Profiteers?

    A UK grandmother became the world’s first recipient of the Pfizer Covid vaccine this week. What does this mean for the pharmaceutical industry? This could be seen as a moment of victory for the industry, which has received a lot of bad press in the last few years. But the prices set by the vaccine makers could also provoke accusations of profiteering. We’ll hear from former Pfizer executive John Lamattina, Thomas Cueni of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers, Tahir Amin of the Initiative for Medicines, Access & Knowledge, as well as Sudarshan Jain, Secretary General of the Indian Pharmaceutical Alliance.(Image credit: Getty Images)

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  • 08.12.2020
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    Is Boeing's 737 Max fit to fly?

    It was grounded worldwide after two tragic accidents. Now, regulators in the US have given it permission to fly again – but will it really be safe? Theo Leggett speaks to Mark Pegram whose son Sam was killed aboard the flight which crashed after take-off from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa in March last year. He also spoke to Ed Pierson, a former senior manager on the 737 production line at Boeing’s Renton factory, just outside Seattle, who gave testimony to the House of Representatives saying how months before the first accident, he had emailed his bosses, warning them how the pressure to produce new planes as fast as possible was undermining safety. In response to Mr Pierson’s testimony, Boeing insisted that the suggestion of a link between his concerns and the Max accidents was completely unfounded. It added that none of the authorities investigating the accidents had found that production conditions in the 737 factory had contributed in any way.The US regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration, has also come under fire. Barry Valentine, a former assistant administrator at the FAA who now works as a consultant for the Wicks group, says lessons have been learnt. Also in the programme is attorney and former inspector general of the US department of transportation, Mary Schiavo. And Bjorn Fehrm, of aviation consultants Leeham, who insists the 737 Max will now be safe.

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  • 07.12.2020
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    The end of the line for commuters?

    How passenger fears and remote working are prompting a crisis in public transport. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Pat Foye, chairman of New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is facing a multi-billion-dollar hole in its finances. Mohamed Mezghani, secretary general of the International Association of Public Transport, describes the challenge of getting commuters back onto trains and subways. Nicole Gelinas, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, explains why transport systems like New York's are so central to a city's economic success.(Photo: Passengers on New York's subway system, Credit: Getty Images)

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  • 05.12.2020
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    Business Weekly

    On this edition of Business Weekly, we analyse the court battle between Shell and the environmental groups which claim the oil giant remains too focused on fossil fuels. We look at a different approach to tackle deforestation, and hear how an economic argument could help the Amazon rainforest. We also get an expert view on floundering UK clothing stores, doubly hit by the pandemic and our changing shopping habits. Could in-store cafes and leisure concessions be just the therapy the retail industry needs? We head to central London to hear the tales of a tailor - a master craftsman who cutting his cloth to suit the future of high-end business wear. And we’ve a lesson in why ‘email etiquette’ needs to be applied to even the shortest message. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 04.12.2020
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    The rise and rise of Instagram

    Sarah Frier, author of No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram, talks about the corporate drama behind the app. The photo sharing app Instagram has transformed business, culture and even our everyday lives. Manuela Saragosa finds out why Instagram sold out to Facebook, and how Kevin Systrom (one of the founders of Instagram) found his values soon collided with those of Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg.(Picture credit: Getty Creative)

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  • 03.12.2020
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    Is the Hyperloop coming of age?

    In November Virgin Hyperloop trialled its first ever journey with passengers, in the desert of Nevada. The futuristic transport concept involves pods inside vacuum tubes carrying passengers at high speeds. So with this proof of concept, are certified Hyperloop transport systems on the horizon? On today’s programme, we’ll hear from Mars Geuze, Chief Commercial Officer of Hardt Hyperloop, who have raised $10m to develop the technology in Europe, as well as Bibop Gresta, founder of Hyperloop Italia, who hints that a big announcement may be imminent. And we’ll also hear from Roseline Walker, Senior Safety and Risk Researcher for the Transport Research Laboratory, who outlines for us some of the concerns and obstacles the new technology faces.(Image Credit: Getty images.)

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  • 02.12.2020
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    Are we giving suits the boot?

    Is the era of the suited office worker at an end? Is the era of the suited office worker at an end?With so many people working from home because of the pandemic, there is far less demand for formal work attire. This is impacting those that make it all over the world, as we learn from Richard Anderson, a tailor on Savile Row - the street in London synonymous with suits - and Raja Fashions in Hong Kong, whose tailors usually travel the globe fitting their clients. We hear that while some office workers can't wait to dress up after the pandemic, others have embraced and even expanded their pyjama collection. Plus, Heather MacGregor, Executive Dean of Heriott-Watt Business School, tells us how her work wear has been impacted by working from home.(Picture: a tailor adjusts a customer's suit in the fitting room at Henry Poole's in Savile Row, London, 1938. Credit Getty Images.)

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  • 01.12.2020
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    The EU's latest row

    A showdown looms between Hungary and Poland and the rest of the EU over the bloc's latest budget, which includes a Covid economic recovery fund worth nearly $900bn. Hungary and Poland blocked approval of the budget earlier in the month over a clause that ties funding with adherence to the rule of law in the bloc, something both countries have been accused of undermining. With the fate of businesses and livelihoods hanging in the balance, the two sides will meet in mid-December at a summit to discuss how they can break the impasse. We hear from Brussels-based reporter Beatriz Ríos, Zoltán Kovács, a spokesman for Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and German MEP Dennis Radtke.(Picture credit: Getty Images) .

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  • 30.11.2020
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    Saving the Amazon rainforest with economics

    Economics has a solution to halt rapid deforestation but can it be implemented? This year has seen some of the worst-ever fires destroy vast tracts of the Amazon rainforest as land there is cleared for farming. We hear how the field of economics may have come up with a solution to halt the Amazon’s rate of deforestation - and what’s needed to set that in motion. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Michael Greenstone, Professor of economics at the University of Chicago and to Professor Luciana Gatti, a researcher at Brazil's National Institute for Space Research which monitors greenhouse gas emissions in Amazon.

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  • 28.11.2020
    23 MB
    49:50
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    Business Weekly

    On this edition of Business Weekly, we look at the third Covid vaccine and ask whether the jabs will be the shot in the arm the global economy needs. We hear the story of a 30-year old man evicted by his parents from the family home after he didn’t pay towards his upkeep. But we also ask what happens when parents rely on their children for money. Plus, we hear from the musicians who want more money when we stream their songs. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 27.11.2020
    8 MB
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    Preppers: Apocalypse, now

    How prepping or survivalism has gone mainstream, with Silicon Valley leading the way. Tech entrepreneur Julie Fredrickson tells Manuela Saragosa how she became a prepper after the electricity went out for days in New York after hurricane Sandy hit back in 2012. She also speaks to serial entrepreneur John Ramey, founder of an online community called The Prepared who told her it's the failure of our institutions that has led so many more people to become preppers. And to Bradley Garratt, a social geographer based at University College Dublin in Ireland. He’s just published a book about prepping called Bunker: Building for the end of times. He told her that preppers are everywhere from the US to Germany to Thailand. (Picture: Emergency preparation, natural disaster supplies. Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 26.11.2020
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    The fight for compensation

    Are NFL players being denied compensation because of racial-norming? Thousands of former American footballers claim they suffered brain injury as players, but are being denied compensation on racial grounds. Ed Butler speaks to Roxanne Gordon, the wife of Amon Gordon, once of the Cleveland Browns, who is one of hundreds of ex-players now claiming compensation from the NFL for brain injury sustained on the field of play. She says that race-norming was used in the testing of his concussion settlement. New York Times journalist, Ken Belson, who's pioneered a lot of the reporting on this story, told him what race-norming is. And Cathy O Neill, author of a book, Weapons of Math Destruction, who also runs Orca, a software auditing company, says race-norming applies in lots of areas of modern life particularly with the increased use of algorithms that can easily dominate and distort the way companies market to consumers, frequently on racial grounds. The NFL says it “remains fully committed to paying all legitimate claims and providing the important benefits that our retired players and their families deserve.”(Picture: Dalvin Cook of the Minnesota Vikings runs the ball as Adrian Amos of the Green Bay Packers tackles on November 01, 2020 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Credit: Getty Images.)

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  • 25.11.2020
    8 MB
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    What it takes to vaccinate the world

    With Covid-19 vaccinations preparing to roll out, how do we make sure everyone gets it? John Johnson, a vaccine programme co-ordinator for Doctors without Borders, outlines just how much is involved in getting vaccines, by truck, motorbike and even foot, to every town and village in the developing world. The Covid-19 vaccine, like others, needs to be transported below a certain temperature, adding an extra layer of complexity, as Toby Peters from the University of Birmingham explains. But David Elliot, of Dulas Solar, says technology like their solar-powered refrigerators can help solve the problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Rebecca Weintraub, Faculty Director of the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard University, is enthusiastic that the world’s institutions can come together to co-ordinate the task.Producers: Frey Lindsay and Joshua Thorpe.(Picture: A Malaria vaccine implementation pilot programme in Malawi, April 2019. Image credit: AFP via Getty Images)

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  • 24.11.2020
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    Rich countries line up for Covid-19 vaccine

    After Pfizer and Moderna vaccines earlier in the month, a third arrives from the University of Oxford. The question now becomes when the vaccines will be distributed and to whom. We’ll hear from Bruce Y Lee, professor at CUNY Graduate School of Public Health, about just how daunting a task a global inoculation programme will be. Meanwhile, Alex de Jonquieres, the head of the Vaccine Alliance Gavi, explains how they’re trying to make sure every country can afford enough of the vaccine to protect their country. But Kate Elder, senior vaccine policy advisor at Doctors without Borders, says there’s nothing to stop richer countries jumping to the front of the queue.Producer: Frey Lindsay.(Image credit: Getty Creative)

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  • 23.11.2020
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    What children owe their parents

    Is it up to children to support their parents financially? Manuela Saragosa hears from Lamees Wajahat in Canada, who has been supporting her parents to pay the bills since she had her first part-time job. But is it the duty of the family, or the state to provide? Manuela speaks to Professor Sarah Harper of Oxford University, who argues that opportunities for younger generations are better than ever before, and that family obligations have always been a part of life. (Pic of piggy bank via Getty Images).

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  • 21.11.2020
    23 MB
    49:50
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    Business Weekly

    In this edition of Business Weekly, we look at Britain’s drive to go green, and how effective the proposed ban on sales of new petrol and diesel cars might be. The Chief Operating Officer of the electric vehicle maker Polestar tells us what help the automotive industry needs from the government to persuade people to buy electric. Plus, we meet the first British Royal Air Force officer to openly transition from male to female and chat to her about transgender rights in the workplace. We also look at the digital afterlife and hear from some of the companies promising to manage our online affairs once we’ve passed away. And we discuss why the British Royal Family are still seen as fashion icons. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

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  • 20.11.2020
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    How Africa's economies are withstanding Coronavirus

    Many African countries have been praised for waging effective campaigns against coronavirus, and the region has a relatively low case count compared to Europe and the US. African economies have likewise been hit less hard, and Amandla Ooko-Ombaka of McKinsey and Company explains how a mix of a youthful population, hot climate and swift government response helped many of these economies stay resilient. But Lisa Owino, of the Kenyan human rights organisation KELIN, says in some cases government intervention over-stepped and was overly punitive to ordinary people. And Tosin Eniolorunda, founder & Chief Executive of Nigerian financial services company TeamApt says digital finance tools helped people maintain social distancing while conducting business.(Picture: Kenyans walk past a mural about the Coronavirus in Nairobi. Picture credit: Getty Images)

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  • 19.11.2020
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    Can Fintech fuel Africa’s Covid recovery?

    2019 was a landmark year for investment into digital financial services, or Fintech, across Africa. Despite the pandemic, the Fintech scene is not only still thriving; it’s poised to play a key role in Africa’s economic recovery. Uzoma Dozie, the head of Nigerian startup Sparkle, says with Covid limiting our ability to handle cash, the cashless revolution in Africa is moving along rapidly. But Viola Llewellyn, president of Ovamba Solutions, which helps finance small businesses across Africa, says some sectors of African banking still lagged behind in digital services provision. Barbara Iyayi of Unicorn Growth Capital says Africa has a “perfect storm” of a young population, prevalent mobile services and a low rate of bank account holding, means Fintech will thrive across African economies but the infrastructure needs to be built up more.(Image credit: Getty Creative)

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